Car Mechanics (UK)

EX­HAUST RE­NEWAL

- Iceland · Tonga

It is ad­vis­able to re­place all rub­ber mounts, as the ex­ist­ing ones may be worn, which places the ex­haust un­der ex­tra strain. You may need to pro­vide evidence that they were re­placed if you make a war­ranty claim later.

 ??  ?? Un­like the ex­haust pic­tured in Steps 1 and 2, many newer cars fea­ture a one-piece sys­tem for ease of man­u­fac­ture. You do not need to re­place the en­tire ex­haust if one sec­tion is dam­aged, be­cause…
Un­like the ex­haust pic­tured in Steps 1 and 2, many newer cars fea­ture a one-piece sys­tem for ease of man­u­fac­ture. You do not need to re­place the en­tire ex­haust if one sec­tion is dam­aged, be­cause…
 ??  ?? Also check the con­di­tion of the heat-shields and their fas­ten­ings. Should they be dam­aged, or miss­ing, you risk a ve­hi­cle fire, es­pe­cially on diesel mod­els that are fit­ted with DPFS.
Also check the con­di­tion of the heat-shields and their fas­ten­ings. Should they be dam­aged, or miss­ing, you risk a ve­hi­cle fire, es­pe­cially on diesel mod­els that are fit­ted with DPFS.
 ??  ?? Ex­haust leaks are not al­ways as ob­vi­ous as the one pic­tured. Small holes may be able to be ban­daged, but this does not buy much time – the en­tire sec­tion will have to be re­placed sooner, or later.
Ex­haust leaks are not al­ways as ob­vi­ous as the one pic­tured. Small holes may be able to be ban­daged, but this does not buy much time – the en­tire sec­tion will have to be re­placed sooner, or later.
 ??  ?? In­spect the en­tire sys­tem care­fully be­fore or­der­ing any parts. You may find that cor­ro­sion has spread from one sec­tion to an­other, such as on this joint that has fused the two sec­tions to­gether.
In­spect the en­tire sys­tem care­fully be­fore or­der­ing any parts. You may find that cor­ro­sion has spread from one sec­tion to an­other, such as on this joint that has fused the two sec­tions to­gether.
 ??  ?? Here, the clamp was so rot­ten that it needed to be cut off. How­ever, be­cause the joint was severely cor­roded, an eas­ier and longer-last­ing repair was ef­fected by cut­ting off the mid-sec­tion end with an an­gle grinder.
Here, the clamp was so rot­ten that it needed to be cut off. How­ever, be­cause the joint was severely cor­roded, an eas­ier and longer-last­ing repair was ef­fected by cut­ting off the mid-sec­tion end with an an­gle grinder.
 ??  ?? Al­ter­na­tively, make your own ref­er­ence marks, by tak­ing mea­sure­ments from the new ex­haust sys­tem. Start the re­moval process, by spray­ing lu­bri­cant (main­te­nance spray, or soapy water) over the rub­ber mount­ings.
Al­ter­na­tively, make your own ref­er­ence marks, by tak­ing mea­sure­ments from the new ex­haust sys­tem. Start the re­moval process, by spray­ing lu­bri­cant (main­te­nance spray, or soapy water) over the rub­ber mount­ings.
 ??  ?? …the orig­i­nal ex­haust may have marks (as high­lighted) to de­note the point at which the ex­haust can be cut and a re­place­ment sec­tion spliced in. Pic­tured is a 2006 Skoda Oc­tavia 1.9 PD diesel back­box to mid­dle sec­tion.
…the orig­i­nal ex­haust may have marks (as high­lighted) to de­note the point at which the ex­haust can be cut and a re­place­ment sec­tion spliced in. Pic­tured is a 2006 Skoda Oc­tavia 1.9 PD diesel back­box to mid­dle sec­tion.
 ??  ?? This will make it eas­ier to sep­a­rate the ex­haust sys­tem from the body­work. Pro­fes­sion­als use a ded­i­cated tool for this; we have seen cheap ver­sions on sale for as little as £15 – a worth­while pur­chase for oc­ca­sional users.
This will make it eas­ier to sep­a­rate the ex­haust sys­tem from the body­work. Pro­fes­sion­als use a ded­i­cated tool for this; we have seen cheap ver­sions on sale for as little as £15 – a worth­while pur­chase for oc­ca­sional users.
 ??  ?? Al­ter­na­tively, you can cut the bracket from the ex­haust sys­tem. Once the work­ing area is clear, you can pull the mount­ing away by hand. Check that the bracket, welded to the body, is nei­ther com­ing away, nor weak­ened by rust.
Al­ter­na­tively, you can cut the bracket from the ex­haust sys­tem. Once the work­ing area is clear, you can pull the mount­ing away by hand. Check that the bracket, welded to the body, is nei­ther com­ing away, nor weak­ened by rust.
 ??  ?? A suit­able rub­ber mount re­moval tool (such as the Laser 5158) helps to re­duce the risk of skinned knuck­les, or dam­age to the rest of the ex­haust sys­tem, if try­ing to ma­nip­u­late the old sys­tem using force.
A suit­able rub­ber mount re­moval tool (such as the Laser 5158) helps to re­duce the risk of skinned knuck­les, or dam­age to the rest of the ex­haust sys­tem, if try­ing to ma­nip­u­late the old sys­tem using force.
 ??  ?? Strik­ing too hard risks de­form­ing the metal, mak­ing it harder to sep­a­rate the pipes. Ma­nip­u­late the sec­tions to split them; if they do not budge, you might have to re­sort to the tech­nique de­scribed in Step 3.
Strik­ing too hard risks de­form­ing the metal, mak­ing it harder to sep­a­rate the pipes. Ma­nip­u­late the sec­tions to split them; if they do not budge, you might have to re­sort to the tech­nique de­scribed in Step 3.
 ??  ?? Be­fore re­mov­ing the sec­tion com­pletely, check if any re­mov­able brack­ets are present that will hinder your abil­ity to dis­mount the ex­haust from the car.
Be­fore re­mov­ing the sec­tion com­pletely, check if any re­mov­able brack­ets are present that will hinder your abil­ity to dis­mount the ex­haust from the car.
 ??  ?? These brack­ets tend to be straight­for­ward to re­move, be­cause they usu­ally are held to the body by nuts, which screw into cap­tive threads that are welded to the floor­pan.
These brack­ets tend to be straight­for­ward to re­move, be­cause they usu­ally are held to the body by nuts, which screw into cap­tive threads that are welded to the floor­pan.
 ??  ?? Should you need to re­place an­other sec­tion, the tech­nique is the same: re­move the rub­ber mounts and clamps, then ma­nip­u­late the ex­haust from the car. Note the slightly dif­fer­ent clamps used on this Skoda’s mid-sec­tion.
Should you need to re­place an­other sec­tion, the tech­nique is the same: re­move the rub­ber mounts and clamps, then ma­nip­u­late the ex­haust from the car. Note the slightly dif­fer­ent clamps used on this Skoda’s mid-sec­tion.
 ??  ?? Es­tab­lish how the front sec­tion is mounted to the car and de­tach any wiring, sen­sors, or pipes from the ex­haust; this diesel Skoda lacks all of these. You may also have to dis­mount the en­gine un­der­tray.
Es­tab­lish how the front sec­tion is mounted to the car and de­tach any wiring, sen­sors, or pipes from the ex­haust; this diesel Skoda lacks all of these. You may also have to dis­mount the en­gine un­der­tray.
 ??  ?? Once freed, ma­nip­u­late the old ex­haust sec­tion out from be­neath the car, tak­ing care not to dam­age any ad­ja­cent parts and paint­work. Old ex­hausts can be dis­posed of as scrap metal at your lo­cal house­hold re­cy­cling cen­tre.
Once freed, ma­nip­u­late the old ex­haust sec­tion out from be­neath the car, tak­ing care not to dam­age any ad­ja­cent parts and paint­work. Old ex­hausts can be dis­posed of as scrap metal at your lo­cal house­hold re­cy­cling cen­tre.
 ??  ?? Where the joint con­sists of one sec­tion of ex­haust fitting in­side an­other, un­bolt, or cut off the clamp. Cor­ro­sion can make the sys­tem tricky to sep­a­rate, but sev­eral taps with a hammer may help free the parts.
Where the joint con­sists of one sec­tion of ex­haust fitting in­side an­other, un­bolt, or cut off the clamp. Cor­ro­sion can make the sys­tem tricky to sep­a­rate, but sev­eral taps with a hammer may help free the parts.
 ??  ?? Re­mov­ing the front ex­haust sec­tion tends to be trick­ier, be­cause of re­duced ac­cess. You may find more elab­o­rate mounts, such as this bracket as­sem­bly, se­cured by sev­eral bolts to the sub­frame.
Re­mov­ing the front ex­haust sec­tion tends to be trick­ier, be­cause of re­duced ac­cess. You may find more elab­o­rate mounts, such as this bracket as­sem­bly, se­cured by sev­eral bolts to the sub­frame.
 ??  ?? This front sec­tion fits di­rectly to the tur­bocharger with a stain­less-steel V-band. Al­ter­na­tively, you may en­counter nuts and bolts, which might be reluc­tant to un­screw and could snap off.
Look for fur­ther brack­ets that are ei­ther fixed to the ex­haust, or might oth­er­wise be a hin­drance as you try to with­draw it. Re­move and re­tain any parts that are in the way for later re­fit­ting.
This front sec­tion fits di­rectly to the tur­bocharger with a stain­less-steel V-band. Al­ter­na­tively, you may en­counter nuts and bolts, which might be reluc­tant to un­screw and could snap off. Look for fur­ther brack­ets that are ei­ther fixed to the ex­haust, or might oth­er­wise be a hin­drance as you try to with­draw it. Re­move and re­tain any parts that are in the way for later re­fit­ting.
 ??  ?? Pic­tured is the point at which the tur­bocharger and ex­haust sys­tem mate. Check that the flange is in good con­di­tion and con­sider giv­ing it a clean with a wire brush, but take care that no par­ti­cles en­ter the hous­ing.
Pic­tured is the point at which the tur­bocharger and ex­haust sys­tem mate. Check that the flange is in good con­di­tion and con­sider giv­ing it a clean with a wire brush, but take care that no par­ti­cles en­ter the hous­ing.
 ??  ?? Ask your sup­plier if the front V-band, such as the one pic­tured, should be re­placed. Klar­ius told us that this Skoda’s clamp was in ser­vice­able con­di­tion and could be reused with­out af­fect­ing its war­ranty.
Ask your sup­plier if the front V-band, such as the one pic­tured, should be re­placed. Klar­ius told us that this Skoda’s clamp was in ser­vice­able con­di­tion and could be reused with­out af­fect­ing its war­ranty.
 ??  ?? Ma­nip­u­late the front pipe from be­neath the car. As it tends to be the hottest part of the sys­tem, cor­ro­sion tends not to be a prob­lem, but the flexible sec­tions can leak after years of vi­bra­tion.
Ma­nip­u­late the front pipe from be­neath the car. As it tends to be the hottest part of the sys­tem, cor­ro­sion tends not to be a prob­lem, but the flexible sec­tions can leak after years of vi­bra­tion.
 ??  ??
 ??  ??
 ??  ?? As it’s easy to make er­rors when or­der­ing ex­haust parts, com­pare a re­place­ment sys­tem with your orig­i­nal, by lay­ing them on the floor side-by-side.
As it’s easy to make er­rors when or­der­ing ex­haust parts, com­pare a re­place­ment sys­tem with your orig­i­nal, by lay­ing them on the floor side-by-side.
 ??  ?? Lo­cate any mount­ing clamps (see in­set pic) and ma­nip­u­late the new ex­haust sys­tem into po­si­tion. You might need the help of an as­sis­tant. Never add as­sem­bly paste upstream of a cat­alytic con­verter.
Lo­cate any mount­ing clamps (see in­set pic) and ma­nip­u­late the new ex­haust sys­tem into po­si­tion. You might need the help of an as­sis­tant. Never add as­sem­bly paste upstream of a cat­alytic con­verter.
 ??  ?? When re­plac­ing a com­plete sys­tem, work from the front end of the car to the rear. This front pipe has its gas­ket re­placed, which lo­cates within the ex­haust and fits be­tween the pipe and tur­bocharger (see Step 23).
When re­plac­ing a com­plete sys­tem, work from the front end of the car to the rear. This front pipe has its gas­ket re­placed, which lo­cates within the ex­haust and fits be­tween the pipe and tur­bocharger (see Step 23).
 ??  ?? It is likely that you find mi­nor dif­fer­ences, such as the shape of this bracket. How­ever, pro­vided that their ends fin­ish in the same di­men­sional po­si­tions, there should be no need to worry.
It is likely that you find mi­nor dif­fer­ences, such as the shape of this bracket. How­ever, pro­vided that their ends fin­ish in the same di­men­sional po­si­tions, there should be no need to worry.
 ??  ?? Dis­card the old parts and fit new rub­ber hang­ers onto the car mounts be­neath the car. To make fitting eas­ier, lu­bri­cate the rub­bers be­fore at­tach­ing the new ex­haust sys­tem.
Dis­card the old parts and fit new rub­ber hang­ers onto the car mounts be­neath the car. To make fitting eas­ier, lu­bri­cate the rub­bers be­fore at­tach­ing the new ex­haust sys­tem.
 ??  ?? Ask your sup­plier for ad­vice on re­place­ment clamp sizes, where you are fitting a new sec­tion onto a one-piece ex­haust. The clamp size is marked on its side.
Ask your sup­plier for ad­vice on re­place­ment clamp sizes, where you are fitting a new sec­tion onto a one-piece ex­haust. The clamp size is marked on its side.
 ??  ??
 ??  ?? The pipes should fit to­gether neatly, be­ing nei­ther too tight, nor too loose. Re­peat Step 33 with your ex­haust as­sem­bly paste, re­mem­ber­ing that it must be used spar­ingly.
The pipes should fit to­gether neatly, be­ing nei­ther too tight, nor too loose. Re­peat Step 33 with your ex­haust as­sem­bly paste, re­mem­ber­ing that it must be used spar­ingly.
 ??  ?? Ma­nip­u­late the back-box to en­sure that it not only clears any com­po­nents be­neath the car but that it is also aligned cen­trally with the pipe cut-out in the rear bumper skirt.
Ma­nip­u­late the back-box to en­sure that it not only clears any com­po­nents be­neath the car but that it is also aligned cen­trally with the pipe cut-out in the rear bumper skirt.
 ??  ?? Start the ve­hi­cle's en­gine and al­low it to run for five min­utes, prior to em­bark­ing on a test-drive. The ex­haust should be rel­a­tively silent, with no evidence of gases es­cap­ing, and the en­gine man­age­ment light should not be il­lu­mi­nated.
Start the ve­hi­cle's en­gine and al­low it to run for five min­utes, prior to em­bark­ing on a test-drive. The ex­haust should be rel­a­tively silent, with no evidence of gases es­cap­ing, and the en­gine man­age­ment light should not be il­lu­mi­nated.
 ??  ?? Fit all brack­ets and mount­ings to the ex­haust, prior to lo­cat­ing and tight­en­ing the clamp bolts. Then, dou­ble-check all bolts for tight­ness and re­fit any re­moved parts.
Fit all brack­ets and mount­ings to the ex­haust, prior to lo­cat­ing and tight­en­ing the clamp bolts. Then, dou­ble-check all bolts for tight­ness and re­fit any re­moved parts.

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