Car Mechanics (UK)

Ve­hi­cle in­sur­ance write-off cat­e­gories

- Belgium · Iceland

When a car is writ­ten-off fol­low­ing an ac­ci­dent, the dam­age in­curred means that it will fall into one of four cat­e­gories. These cat­e­gories were last re­vised in Oc­to­ber 2017.

Cat­e­gory A

The ve­hi­cle has been de­stroyed or burned be­yond recog­ni­tion and must be crushed whole.

Cat­e­gory B

Ve­hi­cles can be broken for parts, sub­ject to be­ing drained of all haz­ardous flu­ids, after which the shell must be crushed and the DVLA is­sued with a Cer­tifi­cate of De­struc­tion (COD).

Cat­e­gory S

The ve­hi­cle has suf­fered struc­tural dam­age. It can be re­paired so long as it is to a road­wor­thy con­di­tion. A marker is then at­tached to the V5C (log­book).

Cat­e­gory N

The ve­hi­cle has suf­fered non-struc­tural dam­age. It can be re­paired so long as it is to a road­wor­thy con­di­tion.

NOTE:

It is pos­si­ble that older cars be­ing sold on the se­cond­hand mar­ket may still fall into two cat­e­gories that have now been dis­con­tin­ued of­fi­cially:

Cat­e­gory C

Can be re­paired, but it would cost more than the ve­hi­cle’s worth. Can be used again if re­paired to a road­wor­thy con­di­tion.

Cat­e­gory D

Can be re­paired and would cost less than the ve­hi­cle’s worth, but other costs may ex­ceed the ve­hi­cle’s value. Can be used again if re­paired to a road­wor­thy con­di­tion.

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