Carp Di­ary

Myles is back with an up­date on how he’s eas­ing BACK INTO HIS FISH­ING, NOW the worst of win­ter has passed and he’s set­tled into a new home...

Carpworld - - CONTENTS - -Myles Gib­son

Myles is back with an up­date on how he’s eas­ing back into his fish­ing, now the worst of win­ter has passed and he’s set­tled into a new home...

The past few months of a gru­elling win­ter have been noth­ing short of abysmal for me and from speak­ing to friends, I wasn’t alone. The in­con­sis­tent weather wasn’t help­ing and as much as I would have liked to have car­ried on re­gard­less, win­ter­time for me is mainly spent at home. It is a time that I use wisely to get any house bits done and gain those much-needed brownie points with the Mrs. I still got out when I could, mainly pike fish­ing and a bit on the rivers with friends. A few hours here and there was lots of fun. I also spent a fair bit of time in the garage, get­ting all the gear or­gan­ised and prepped for the com­ing sea­son. It is amaz­ing how long it takes, but once it’s done, it al­lows that rhythm in the warmer months to go smoothly. All the reels were spooled with fresh line, spare tackle as­sem­bled and or­dered, and the freezer loaded with bait. The spring on Din­ton’s Black Swan had been kind to me in the past and I wanted it to con­tinue this year.

While I didn’t plan on do­ing much carp fish­ing, I did try and squeeze the odd trip in when there was a break in the weather. It was the last week of Jan­uary and although we had been hit by a cold spell, there were good tem­per­a­tures fore­cast and with that front came strong winds. Much to my sur­prise, I did see quite a few fish show­ing in the bay. Although the weather was good, there hadn’t been much caught at all since the win­ter set in and these fish looked up for it. It was late at night and I was just hav­ing a brew be­fore bed, when I saw an­other one show, and right near the area I was fish­ing too. It looked good for a bite.

Ear­lier on in the day, I had tried some­thing a lit­tle dif­fer­ent. I tied half a dozen big bags of mag­gots on to the lead­ing rod and cast them out to the spot. It was fairly deep wa­ter and I didn’t want them to drift around with the tow from spomb­ing. By let­ting them hit the bot­tom and count to 30, I made sure that all those mag­gots were on the bot­tom and a per­fect lit­tle trap was set.

With that, an­other carp showed, be­fore the bob­bin smacked the blank. It dropped back down again, be­fore go­ing up and pulling out of the clip

I awoke in the morn­ing, got a brew in hand and sat watch­ing the lake. A small mir­ror showed right over the spot and I was sure one of the rods had to go. A load of birds gath­ered near the spot and I feared the worst. Then, for no rea­son at all, they all spooked and hastily went away. With that, an­other carp showed, be­fore the bob­bin smacked the blank. It dropped back down again, be­fore go­ing up and pulling out of the clip. I picked the rod up, felt the fish and it all went slack – hook pull. The lead had gone and the point was burred over; I couldn’t be­lieve it, but it was a good sign that I was do­ing some­thing right.

I did see a cou­ple more that trip, but no fur­ther ac­tion came. I had a cou­ple of trips in Fe­bru­ary, but it was bleak, with very lit­tle hap­pen­ing. Only one small carp had ac­tu­ally been caught since the turn of the year, which wasn’t too much of a sur­prise.

The fore­cast for my next trip gave strong north east­er­lies, which was per­fect for fish­ing out at range from the golf bank. I had been do­ing most of my time in the bay, but with these con­di­tions I had to give it a go on the golf bank. I got the rods out smoothly and dot­ted 30 baits over each rod. I left them out for 48 hours and on that fi­nal morn­ing, all of them had been picked up by birds. The wind had changed and I couldn’t get the rods back out to the spots. For my fi­nal night I fished the bay with zigs, but to no avail.

The Beast from the East ar­rived and hit with such force that the lake was cer­tainly go­ing to be knocked back af­ter that, so I didn’t fish that week. When it fi­nally went though, I was pretty ea­ger to get back down. With all that cold wa­ter com­ing in, I fished a swim called Lit­tle No Dogs, as it con­trols a good chunk of deeper wa­ter. I thought if the fish were go­ing to re­treat to any­where, it would be there. I fished zigs for a few nights, but didn’t so much as see a carp. It was re­ally quiet, so deep down I wasn’t overly sur­prised. I was get­ting frus­trated with it all – it had felt like the long­est win­ter ever and I was pray­ing for spring to ar­rive.

I was back down the fol­low­ing week and the weather had been pretty steady since I had been gone. I got down in the morn­ing and, af­ter see­ing noth­ing, I de­cided to set up in the mouth of the bay, where I had seen the ma­jor­ity of the shows since fish­ing it in the cold.

I chucked out three zigs that night, but with no joy. I saw a carp stick its head out in front of me, so I brought the zigs in and cast three hinges to the area. It then rained heav­ily for the next few hours and I didn’t see an­other fish. I wasn’t feel­ing it and in my head – I knew I needed to move. The weather was due to change that af­ter­noon, with a big west­erly set­ting in.

A few swims up was Sui­cide, which gave ac­cess to the gap be­tween the is­lands. With a west­erly com­ing, it meant that it would be di­rectly off my back. It was an area I had a lot of suc­cess in at the same time last year, so all the gear was on the bar­row and I was off.

I fished a swim called Lit­tle No Dogs, as it con­trols a good chunk of deeper wa­ter. I thought if the fish were go­ing to re­treat to any­where, it would be there

With a west­erly com­ing, it meant that it would be di­rectly off my back. It was an area I had a lot of suc­cess in at the same time last year, so all the gear was on the bar­row and I was off

The swim it­self is an ab­so­lute night­mare to fish. You don’t have much room to cast and wad­ing out is im­pos­si­ble too. The spots were over 160 yards out, so it meant hav­ing a small drop on the rod and gen­er­at­ing as much power as you could to get out there. Af­ter break­ing a cou­ple of rods and hav­ing all sorts of dra­mas, I got three rods rock­ing to the ar­eas I wanted them in. I nipped out in the boat and spread 50 baits around the size of a ten­nis court.

Due to how long it had taken me to get them out and the clar­ity of the wa­ter, Krill pop-ups were on all three rods. I didn’t want the birds to be pick­ing me up and, by hav­ing a dull bait out there, they had less chance of spot­ting them. All three were on hinges – big, strong com­po­nents so that noth­ing would let me down.

I nor­mally fish tub­ing, but I had a night­mare thread­ing it and I was pushed for time so in this in­stance I’d quickly whipped up some short lead core lead­ers. In the past from that swim I had only ever had bites dur­ing the day. It took me by sur­prise when one of the rods was away at 3am that morn­ing. I was set up at the top of the bank and be­ing wo­ken up by two beeps means that there is one on. I flew down there and con­nected with a carp.

It turned out to be a 19lb mir­ror, which was a great start to what I was hop­ing would be an­other good year. I did a cou­ple of shots and got it back, leav­ing the rod to be re­cast in the morn­ing. At around 11am the right-han­der let off a cou­ple of beeps. I dropped what I was do­ing, scram­bled down the steps and was in to an­other fish.

Play­ing them at such a range is tricky, as you are never sure if it is a big one or not. When it got closer I re­alised it wasn’t, but a stun­ning look­ing mir­ror all the same. I slid the net un­der it and what a carp it was. A lit­tle over 20lb – dark and with the most in­cred­i­ble scal­ing on it. I was buzzing, to­tally made up with how the ses­sion was go­ing and I felt like it was hard earned too.

I got the rod wrapped up and a fresh rig tied on. I walked down the path to re­cast the rod, when the other rod next to it was away. I picked up into an­other hard-fight­ing carp, which again turned out to be a mir­ror, but slightly big­ger this time too at over 25lb. Af­ter an hour of thrash­ing, I man­aged to get all the rods back out and went out to top the swim up with some more Krill.

myles gib­son

TOP Myles per­sisted with the zigs dur­ing the high pres­sure weather fronts

MID­DLE A new pur­chase to help move the gear and the boat

A few baits spread in a large area is some­thing that has worked well for MylesLEFT

BE­LOWThe first one of the year for Myles – a crack­ing 19lb 10oz mir­ror

LEFTBig hinges were the rigs of choice

What a carp, at an ir­relevent weight of 20lb 10oz TOP

MID­DLE A new one that Myles didnt recog­nise – a lovely grey mir­ror of 28lb 4oz

LEFT The Krill has been the bait of choice through­out the year

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