Classic Trial

INTERNATIO­NAL

- Words: John Hulme, Alan Wright, Charly Demathieu and Mike Rapley Pictures: Eric Kitchen, Alan Vines, Toon van de Vliet, Mauri/Fontsere Collection and the Giulio Mauri Copyright, Schreiber Family and Francesco Rappini

1980 FIM WTC Part Two

It’s only when you reflect on the 1980 FIM World Trials Championsh­ip that you begin to realise that, regarding machinery and world round winners, it was one of the strangest that has ever happened. In the majority of sports consistenc­y, it is only once all the points are totalled up at the end of a season determines the winner. Throw in the change of machines and the disruption this creates, affecting some of the very top riders, and you will find that American Bernie Schreiber, winning 50% of the 12 rounds, still did not give him the glory of taking the ultimate goal of the FIM World title. The winner of the title in 1980 was Sweden’s Ulf Karlson; it was his consistenc­y that gave him the title with only one world round win to his name.

It was at the Hurst Cup, in Ireland Ulf Karlson won, and it was the confidence from this that made him more determined to make 1980 his year. He only had two disappoint­ing rides, in France and the Czech Republic. Still, it was a case of ‘Viva Montesa’ as he gave the Spanish motorcycle manufactur­er its very first FIM motorcycle world title. They had fielded a very strong team in the world championsh­ip, and that financial commitment had been well rewarded especially during challengin­g Spanish economic times.

Two non-points-scoring rides from Schreiber, who had moved from Bultaco after his win at round six in France to Italjet, denied him any chance of championsh­ip glory again after he had taken the world title from Vesterinen in 1979. He won the last four world rounds as the new Italian machine started to prove its competitiv­eness at the cutting edge of sport as it was developed with one eye on the 1980 title, but it proved not to be.

1980 CHAMPIONSH­IP – PART TWO

Here we take a brief look at the final six rounds of the 1980 championsh­ip, where Belgium’s new young sensation on the four-stroke Honda, Eddy Lejeune, started to emerge as a future world championsh­ip contender with a third win in Switzerlan­d. FIM World Trials Champion from 1976 to 1978 Yrjo Vesterinen took his only win in the1980 series in Germany before the new combinatio­n of Schreiber on the Italjet dominated the remaining four rounds as it concluded in the Czech Republic.

ROUND 7: 23rd JUNE 1980 FULLY, SWITZERLAN­D. ENTRY: 48

In a high-scoring event contested over three laps of 20 sections, the man on form was young Eddy Lejeune. With the four-stroke Honda running well he took a clear win from Ulf Karlson, who remained calm to finish second in front of a new top-three finisher from France, Christian Desnoyers on the SWM.

The win from Lejeune moved him up into second in the championsh­ip as many of the top riders, including Schreiber and Vesterinen, ran into problems with the time limit, which left them out of the results. It had been a long day in hot conditions. Still, the English riders did themselves proud, with all three of them finishing in the top ten: Shepherd, fourth; Rathmell, fifth; and Lampkin sixth — all gaining much-needed championsh­ip points and finishing the event within a single mark of each other.

The debut of the new Italjet had been a difficult one, with machine problems during the event hampering Schreiber, and the question was could he bounce back one week later in Germany.

RESULTS: 1: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 83; 2: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 100; 3: Christian Desnoyers (SWM-FRA) 104; 4: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 114; 5: Malcolm Rathmell (Montesa-GBR) 115; 6: Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR) 115; 7: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 119; 8: Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA) 119; 9: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 128; 10: Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT) 131; 11: Jean Marie Lejeune (Montesa-BEL) 142; 12: Adrien Prato (Montesa-FRA) 153; 13: Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN) 160; 14: Alberto Juvanteny (Ossa-ESP) 161; 15: Pierre Ramonda (Montesa-FRA) 162.

ROUND 8: 30th JUNE 1980 KIEFIRSFEL­DEN, GERMANY. ENTRY: 64

All the eyes of the trials world were on the new combinatio­n of Schreiber and the Italjet. Still, it was the three-time FIM World Trials Champion Yrjo Vesterinen who took a very welcome victory in Germany. Once again, on an overcast day, the event was contested over three laps of 20 sections. Many sections based in and around a fast-flowing river and its rocky banks.

‘Vesty’ started well, which is always a good indication of a man on form, and opened up a lead that would never be challenged to take Montesa’s second and last world round win in the 1980 series. In second position was a delighted Martin Lampkin, scoring his best result to date since his move in April from Bultaco to SWM. A good strong ride from the championsh­ip leader Karlson kept him at the head of the points table as Austria’s Joe Wallman had his best world round ride to date finishing in fourth, just one mark off the podium. After another troubled day on the Italjet Schreiber once again failed to score any world championsh­ip points.

RESULTS: 1: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 59; 2: Martin Lampkin (SWMGBR) 76; 3: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 84; 4: Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT) 85; 5: Malcolm Rathmell (Montesa-GBR) 90; 6: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 95; 7: Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA) 96; 8: Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP) 99; 9: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 102; 10: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 104; 11: Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA) 106; 12: Pedro Olle (Montesa-ESP) 109; 13: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 112; 14: Christian Desnoyers (SWM-FRA) 114; 15: Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN) 122.

ROUND 9: 13th JULY 1980 CHIESA VALMALENCO, ITALY: ENTRY: 61

An American rider in Italy, competing on an Italian machine and taking victory, was a huge boost to the new Italjet trials team. And for a very patriotic home crowd, Great Britain’s Martin Lampkin made it an Italian one-two for the very first time in an FIM World Championsh­ip trial with a very solid second position on the SWM. Super-consistent Karlson took the final step on the podium once again to protect his championsh­ip lead with another good points haul.

With Malcolm Rathmell missing from world championsh­ip action with a damaged knee in a plaster cast it was left to Rob Shepherd to keep the union jack flying with a fifth position, just behind Vesterinen. With five Italian machines in the top ten positions, the tide of domination by Spanish machines was beginning to turn at an alarming rate. Ossa had their new yellow model in the hands of both Antonio Gorgot and Alberto Juvanteny, but with the factory doors closed at Bultaco and production problems at Montesa, it was not looking good for the future of this oncedomina­nt force in the trials world. It was the first time since the world championsh­ip started that Bultaco did not have a machine in the top 10! RESULTS: 1: Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA) 98; 2: Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR) 105; 3: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 106; 4: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 122; 5: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 130; 6: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 135;

7: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 137; 8: Fulvio Adamoli (Montesa-ITA) 137; 9: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 140; 10: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 143; 11: Alberto Juvanteny (Ossa-ESP) 143; 12: Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT) 144; 13: Felix Krahnstove­r (Montesa-GER) 145; 14: Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA) 147; 15: Lino Rodolfa Della (Bultaco-ITA) 155.

ROUND 10: 24th AUGUST 1980 TERVAKOVSK­I, FINLAND. ENTRY: 46

You can never keep a good man down, and with the new Italjet improving at every round as it was developed in the world championsh­ip Bernie Schreiber took yet another win in front of Ulf Karlson. Having made the move from the ailing Bultaco brand to Montesa, Spain’s Manuel Soler certainly showed he had got the hang of the unfamiliar machine with an excellent third place, just two marks behind series leader Karlson. Giving the Spanish motorcycle manufactur­er Ossa something to be happy about was most welcome as Alberto Juvanteny finished in fourth just in front of the ever-improving Antonio Gorgot. Riding on home ground, Yrjo Vesterinen finished sixth and dropped to third in the overall championsh­ip.

With Rathmell still recovering from his knee injury it was not a good day for either Rob Shepherd, who finished 12th, or Martin Lampkin, who came home also out of the points in 14th position. With the top four in the championsh­ip breaking away from the rest, Karlson still held the advantage over Schreiber with the points at 104 to 81 for the chasing American.

RESULTS: 1: Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA) 31; 2: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 34; 3: Manuel Soler (Montesa-ESP) 36; 4: Alberto Juvanteny (Ossa-ESP) 36; 5: Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP) 47; 6: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 53; 7: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 53; 8: Ettore Baldini (Bultaco/Italjet-ITA) 61; 9: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 62; 10: Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN) 64; 11: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 65; 12: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 67; 13: Fred Michaud (Ossa-FRA) 70; 14: Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR) 72; 15: Raimo Erakare (Bultaco-FIN) 74.

ROUND 11: 31st AUGUST 1980 KARLSKOGA, SWEDEN. ENTRY: 54

At the close of the day in Sweden the FIM added a new trials world champion to its list as Karlson finished second to Schreiber to seal the 1980 title, with one round remaining, in his home country; he was elated. The event was held in the west of Sweden where the event was contested over two laps of 31 sections in a heavily wooded area. With the Italjet now looking and sounding so much more competitiv­e, Schreiber carried his winning form and Karlson, try as he might, had no answer to the American’s riding. It was close at the finish of the event as Karlson accepted the handshake from Schreiber as the outgoing world champion.

As the champagne flowed with the first FIM Trials World Championsh­ip for Karlson and Montesa, Schreiber knew he had done all he could. On the final step of the podium in third position, Eddy Lejeune had pulled back more points on Vesterinen in the fight to finish the championsh­ip in the top three. Martin Lampkin got back into the points in seventh as Shepherd repeated his 12th position from the week before. RESULTS: 1: Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA) 99; 2: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 105; 3: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 115; 4: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 121;

5: Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP) 137; 6: Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA) 139; 7: Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR) 144; 8: Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN) 146; 9: Manuel Soler (Montesa-ESP) 151; 10: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 155; 11: Lars Brask (SWMSWE) 156; 12: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 159; 13: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 160; 14: Fred Michaud (Ossa-FRA) 167; 15: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 169.

ROUND 12: 14th SEPTEMBER 1980 RICANY, CZECH REPUBLIC. ENTRY: 60

Yes, it was that man Schreiber who finished the world championsh­ip series with a win after three laps of 25 sections while also reflecting on what might have been. Who knows how the championsh­ip would have finished if Italjet had their new machine well developed when he moved from Bultaco mid-season? In a first for the world trials championsh­ip, it was an Italian one-two as Spain’s Jaime Subira on the Fantic finished second to Schreiber. Despite the small engine capacity of 156cc Subira used all his experience to finish so high in the results.

The icing on the cake for Fantic was from fellow Spanish rider Xavier Miquel, who took the last point in 10th as the red machines proved to be well up to the rigours in the tough world championsh­ip rounds. Ossa was pleased to finally break into the top three with the new yellow ‘Gripper’ model in the hands of Antonio Gorgot. In the fight for third position in the final championsh­ip, ‘Vesty’ out-pointed Eddy Lejeune, which secured it. Karlson was sixth followed by Rob Shepherd in his final world round on the four-stroke Honda. The mighty Japanese manufactur­er had three four-stroke machines in the top 10 as Kiyoteru Hattori came home ninth on the 250cc model.

RESULTS: 1: Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA) 11; 2: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 20; 3: Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP) 25; 4: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 26; 5: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 33; 6: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 34; 7: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 35; 8: Jean Luc Colson (Montesa-BEL) 37; 9: Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN) 37; 10: Xavier Miquel (Fantic-ESP) 38; 11: Ettore Baldini (ItaljetITA) 40; 12: Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR) 40; 13: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 43; 14: Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN) 44; 15: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 45.

1980 FIM WORLD TRIALS CHAMPIONSH­IP POSITIONS

RESULTS: 1: Ulf Karlson (Montesa-SWE) 121; 2: Bernie Schreiber (Bultaco/Italjet-USA) 111; 3: Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN) 94; 4: Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL) 86; 5: Martin Lampkin (Bultaco/SWM-GBR) 51; 6: Manuel Soler (Bultaco/Montesa-ESP) 47; 7: Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP) 41; 8: Malcolm Rathmell (Montesa-GBR) 40; 9: Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR) 39; 10: Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP) 29; 11: Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA) 18; 12: Mick Andrews (Majesty Yamaha-GBR) 15; 13: Christian Desnoyers (SWM-FRA) 14; 14: Charles Coutard (SWM-FRA) 13; 15: Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT) 9; 16: Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA) 9; 17: Alberto Juvanteny (Ossa-ESP) 8; 18: Jean Marie Lejeune (Montesa-BEL) 5; 19: John Reynolds (Beamish Suzuki-GBR) 4; 20: Chris Myers (Bultaco-GBR) 4; 21: Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN) 4; 22: Jean Luc Colson (Montesa-BEL) 3; 23: Ettore Baldini (Bultaco/Italjet-ITA) 3; 24: Fulvio Adamoli (Montesa-ITA) 3; 25: Fred Michaud (Ossa-FRA) 3; 26: Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN) 2; 27: Claude Goset (SWM-BEL) 2; 28: Xavier Miquel (Fantic-ESP) 1; 29: Pedro Olle (Montesa-ESP) 1; 30: Nigel Birkett (Montesa-GBR) 1.

WINNERS: Schreiber 6; Lejeune 3; Andrews 1; Karlson 1; Vesterinen 1. NATIONALIT­IES: GBR: 7; ESP: 6; BEL: 4; FRA: 4; ITA: 3; FIN: 2; AUT: 1; JPN: 1; SWE: 1; USA: 1. MACHINES: Montesa: 9; Bultaco: 7; SWM: 6; Honda: 3; Ossa: 3; Fantic: 2; Italjet: 2; Beamish Suzuki: 1; Majesty Yamaha: 1.

A TIME FOR CHANGE

It was a well-deserved 1980 FIM World Trials Championsh­ip for both Ulf Karlson and Montesa. Both had persevered from the start of the FIM series in 1975 to win the ultimate goal in the belief that one day it would happen and the dream would become a reality, and it did. Just like the once-mighty manufactur­ing of competitio­n motorcycle­s in Great Britain that went into decline, it was now time for Bultaco to face the same reality. The dominant and strong Bultaco worldchamp­ionship-winning team from 1975 to 1979 of Martin Lampkin, Yrjo Vesterinen and Bernie Schreiber was now over with Lampkin at SWM, Vesterinen at Montesa and Schreiber at Italjet. The Italians had arrived with Fantic, Italjet and SWM and now the power of motorcycle trials manufactur­ing was moving from Spain. On the rider front, many new faces had arrived in 1980 who would also reshape the future of world trials championsh­ip winners.

 ??  ??
 ??  ?? Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA): He won the last four world rounds on the new Italian machine, but two non-pointsscor­ing rides after his win at round six in France on the Bultaco denied him any chance of championsh­ip glory.
Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL): With a good world championsh­ip season behind him the young Belgian rider was rewarded with a Japanese factory contract to remain with the four-stroke Honda in 1981.
Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN): An inconsiste­nt season with only one win and a non-scoring ride in Switzerlan­d left ‘Vesty’ in third position in the championsh­ip.
Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR): Still showing that he had the ability to mix it up with the younger riders the move from Bultaco had unsettled him, but fifth in the championsh­ip was still a good result in the circumstan­ces.
Bernie Schreiber (Italjet-USA): He won the last four world rounds on the new Italian machine, but two non-pointsscor­ing rides after his win at round six in France on the Bultaco denied him any chance of championsh­ip glory. Eddy Lejeune (Honda-BEL): With a good world championsh­ip season behind him the young Belgian rider was rewarded with a Japanese factory contract to remain with the four-stroke Honda in 1981. Yrjo Vesterinen (Montesa-FIN): An inconsiste­nt season with only one win and a non-scoring ride in Switzerlan­d left ‘Vesty’ in third position in the championsh­ip. Martin Lampkin (SWM-GBR): Still showing that he had the ability to mix it up with the younger riders the move from Bultaco had unsettled him, but fifth in the championsh­ip was still a good result in the circumstan­ces.
 ??  ?? Manuel Soler (Bultaco/Montesa-ESP): Another rider affected by a change of machine after Bultaco, he was linked with Italjet before settling at Montesa.
Malcolm Rathmell (Montesa-GBR): Missing the middle of the season with a knee injury kept him down the points table.
Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP): This new star on the yellow Ossa had his season interrupte­d by his national military service in Spain.
Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR): As the season closed so did the Honda contract for ‘Shep’ in the world championsh­ip; the ride in the Czech Republic would be his last one on the red four-stroke.
Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP): For many, his rides on the tough demanding hazards on the 156cc engined Fantic opened the eyes as to where the Italian manufactur­er was heading in the world championsh­ip.
Manuel Soler (Bultaco/Montesa-ESP): Another rider affected by a change of machine after Bultaco, he was linked with Italjet before settling at Montesa. Malcolm Rathmell (Montesa-GBR): Missing the middle of the season with a knee injury kept him down the points table. Antonio Gorgot (Ossa-ESP): This new star on the yellow Ossa had his season interrupte­d by his national military service in Spain. Rob Shepherd (Honda-GBR): As the season closed so did the Honda contract for ‘Shep’ in the world championsh­ip; the ride in the Czech Republic would be his last one on the red four-stroke. Jaime Subira (Fantic-ESP): For many, his rides on the tough demanding hazards on the 156cc engined Fantic opened the eyes as to where the Italian manufactur­er was heading in the world championsh­ip.
 ??  ?? Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA): Without a doubt, one of the best young riders for the future.
Charles Coutard (SWM/Montesa-FRA): Yet another rider to make a machine move during the season, he moved from the Italian SWM and arrived in Finland with the Montesa.
Mick Andrews (Majesty Yamaha-GBR): Taking 15 points from his win in Great Britain at the start of the season with a ride that is still talked about, ‘Magical’ proved his natural ability.
Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT): Two good rides in Switzerlan­d and Germany put Austria on the trials map.
Gilles Burgat (SWM-FRA): Without a doubt, one of the best young riders for the future. Charles Coutard (SWM/Montesa-FRA): Yet another rider to make a machine move during the season, he moved from the Italian SWM and arrived in Finland with the Montesa. Mick Andrews (Majesty Yamaha-GBR): Taking 15 points from his win in Great Britain at the start of the season with a ride that is still talked about, ‘Magical’ proved his natural ability. Jo Wallman (Bultaco-AUT): Two good rides in Switzerlan­d and Germany put Austria on the trials map.
 ??  ?? Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA): SWM were becoming a much stronger team, and the Italian remained an important part of that.
Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN): This was another good young rider trying to make his way in the world championsh­ip.
John Reynolds (Beamish Suzuki-GBR): ‘JR’ scored his four championsh­ip points in one go in Ireland at the opening round.
Ettore Baldini (Bultaco-ITA): He had started the season on a Bultaco but, before the season closed, became yet another rider to change machines.
Danio Galeazzi (SWM-ITA): SWM were becoming a much stronger team, and the Italian remained an important part of that. Timo Ryysy (Bultaco-FIN): This was another good young rider trying to make his way in the world championsh­ip. John Reynolds (Beamish Suzuki-GBR): ‘JR’ scored his four championsh­ip points in one go in Ireland at the opening round. Ettore Baldini (Bultaco-ITA): He had started the season on a Bultaco but, before the season closed, became yet another rider to change machines.
 ??  ?? Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN): The two world championsh­ip points were well deserved, riding the four-stroke Seeley Honda. These were the first FIM World Trials Championsh­ip points for a Japanese rider.
Nigel Birkett (Montesa-GBR): Scoring his only point in Ireland ‘Birks’ would not complete a full season on the Montesa.
Ettore Baldini (Italjet-ITA): Who would have believed that before the season closed we would have two green Italjets finishing in the points in Finland!
Michelin started to make inroads to the trials tyre market after the domination by both Pirelli and Dunlop.
Kiyoteru Hattori (Honda-JPN): The two world championsh­ip points were well deserved, riding the four-stroke Seeley Honda. These were the first FIM World Trials Championsh­ip points for a Japanese rider. Nigel Birkett (Montesa-GBR): Scoring his only point in Ireland ‘Birks’ would not complete a full season on the Montesa. Ettore Baldini (Italjet-ITA): Who would have believed that before the season closed we would have two green Italjets finishing in the points in Finland! Michelin started to make inroads to the trials tyre market after the domination by both Pirelli and Dunlop.

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