A-Z OF MIND­FUL­NESS

I – why we need to work at be­ing idle.

Countryfile Magazine - - Contents -

You will need:

• Spring bulbs from gar­den cen­tre – cro­cus, hy­acinth, daf­fodil, minia­ture iris, grape hy­acinth and Siberian squill/scilla all work well • Con­tain­ers – any­thing from enamel bowls to jam jars or small gal­vanised buck­ets will do • All-pur­pose com­post or bulb fi­bre • Pea gravel or pieces of bro­ken clay flower pot • Black bin bag/old fab­ric

1

Choose the con­tain­ers you will use for forc­ing your bulbs. Jam jars, old clay plant pots and sim­ple white enamel bowls work well. To pre­vent water from pool­ing in con­tain­ers without drainage holes, place a hand­ful of pea gravel or some bro­ken pieces of clay pot at the bot­tom.

2

Put a layer of com­post in the bot­tom of your con­tainer (over the gravel if you are us­ing it) and place your bulbs on top of this layer. Try not to al­low them to touch each other as this might cause them to rot. Cover the bulbs with more com­post so that just the tips of them pro­trude above the sur­face. Add la­bels and water them un­til the soil be­comes moist but not sod­den.

3

Place your con­tain­ers of bulbs in a cold but dry place such as a shed, the cor­ner of a garage or a cup­board. Cut out the light by cov­er­ing the pots with a black bin bag or 2–3 lay­ers of old fab­ric.

4

Check your bulbs ev­ery two weeks or so. If the com­post/bulb fi­bre be­comes dry, then water it a lit­tle. Most bulbs will re­quire 8–10 weeks in their cool, dark spots – oth­ers, such as pa­per­white nar­cissi, will grow faster and may only need 5–7 weeks. Once the shoots are 3–5cm tall, move the con­tain­ers to a cool, light win­dowsill, then sit back and en­joy your own tiny ver­sion of spring in the midst of win­ter.

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