ON THIS DAY

Daily Mail - - News - Compiled by ETAN SMALLMAN and ADAM JACOT DE BOINOD

FROM THE DAILY MAIL AR­CHIVE JUNE 14, 1945

Mr CHURCHILL, in his sec­ond ra­dio elec­tion broad­cast, warned that if Bri­tain did not have larger fam­i­lies, in 30 years we would have a far larger num­ber of peo­ple over 65, and fewer younger peo­ple to carry the bur­den of the na­tion’s work. The fu­ture of Bri­tain de­pended on an in­crease in the num­ber of homes and the size of fam­i­lies.

JUNE 14, 1965

MID­DLE-AGED cou­ples are given ad­vice by the Na­tional Mar­riage Guid­ance Coun­cil to­day on what to do if their mar­riage is fail­ing. The ad­vice is given in a 2s 6d book­let called Mid­dle-Aged Mar­riage. ‘There is no rea­son to ex­pect any great less­en­ing of sex­ual feel­ing,’ it says. ‘Some cou­ples have reached greater sat­is­fac­tion.’

HAPPY BIRTH­DAY

JU­DITH KERR, 95. As a child, the au­thor fled to Lon­don to es­cape the Nazis. She wrote her first book, The Tiger Who Came To Tea, (right) aged 45. It cel­e­brates its 50th birth­day this year and has never been out of print. Her pub­lish­ers ini­tially said the scene in which the tiger, head crammed into the sink, drinks ‘all the wa­ter in the tap’ was ‘rather un­re­al­is­tic’. Kerr puts her longevity down to long walks, a Mar­tini rosso with lunch and a whisky in the even­ing. DON­ALD TRUMP, 72. The 45th U.S. Pres­i­dent was the old­est ever to as­sume the pres­i­dency (the av­er­age age for in­com­ing U.S. lead­ers is 55; he was 70). The first bil­lion­aire pres­i­dent is the first in more than a cen­tury not to have a White House pet.

BORN ON THIS DAY

FREDRIC BAUR (1918-2008). The U.S. chemist in­vented the Pringles can (right), fil­ing his patent in 1966. He in­sisted his chil­dren bury his ashes in one. El­dest son Larry said: ‘My sib­lings and I briefly de­bated what flavour to use, but I said, “Look, we need to use the orig­i­nal.” ’ HARRIET BEECHER SToWE (1811-1896). The U.S. au­thor wrote 30 books, but her best­known novel was Un­cle Tom’s Cabin, a response to the 1850 Fugi­tive Slave Law, which pun­ished any­one who of­fered run­away slaves food or shel­ter. The book be­came the big­gest best­seller of the 19th cen­tury af­ter the Bi­ble. When Pres­i­dent Abra­ham Lin­coln met her around the time of the Civil War, he said: ‘So you’re the lit­tle lady whose book started this big war.’

ON JUNE 14…

IN 1922, War­ren Hard­ing be­came the first U.S. pres­i­dent heard on ra­dio. IN 1928, Em­me­line Pankhurst died, aged 69, a few weeks be­fore women re­ceived the vote on equal terms to men.

WORD WIZARDRY GUESS THE DEF­I­NI­TION: Scrimshan­der (coined 1906)

A) one who adorns ivory or shells with carved or coloured de­signs. B) A turn­stile. C) A scare­crow. An­swer be­low

PHRASE EX­PLAINED Mum’s the word:

Mean­ing to keep quiet; from the 17th cen­tury as an adap­tion of ‘mum is coun­sel’, used in the 16th cen­tury.

QUOTE FOR TO­DAY

PUNC­TU­AL­ITY is the virtue of the bored. Eve­lyn Waugh, nov­el­ist (1903-1966)

JOKE OF THE DAY

My WIFE thinks I’m a fool for build­ing a car out of mac­a­roni. She won’t be laugh­ing when i drive pasta. Guess the Def­i­ni­tion an­swer: A

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