SHOOT­ING STEPS

Digital Photograper - - Shooting Skills -

1

SET UP YOUR EQUIP­MENT Mount your cam­era on a tri­pod and com­pose the scene. Fo­cus the lens and take a test shot to check the ex­po­sure is okay and if you need to use any fil­ters. In this case a

0.9 ‘hard’ ND grad was needed to bal­ance the sky and fore­ground.

2

AS­SESS THE SHOT The ini­tial shot looks fine in terms of com­po­si­tion and ex­po­sure. The ND grad fil­ter has bal­anced the bright dawn sky with the darker fore­ground and the im­age is sharp from front to back. The only prob­lem is no mo­tion has been recorded, so a slower shut­ter speed must be used.

3TO

SLOW DOWN THE SHUT­TER SPEED

record more mo­tion in the scene, you need a slower shut­ter speed. To achieve this, use a low ISO and stop the lens down to a small aper­ture – in this case ISO 100 and f16. If light lev­els are nat­u­rally low, do­ing this may give you the de­sired speed.

4

MO­TION BLUR Here you can see that the gondolas in the fore­ground are def­i­nitely blurred now be­cause they were mov­ing up and down dur­ing the 0.8sec ex­po­sure. For some pho­tog­ra­phers this would be enough mo­tion, but it’s worth ex­per­i­ment­ing with even longer ex­po­sures to see if the ef­fect can be im­proved.

5

USE A NEU­TRAL DEN­SITY FIL­TER If your lens is stopped right down to its small­est aper­ture, the ISO is at its low­est set­ting and you’re still not record­ing enough mo­tion, your next step is to use an ND fil­ter. In this case, a 1.2 ND fil­ter was used to re­duce the ex­po­sure by four stops.

6

MIS­SION AC­COM­PLISHED By us­ing an ND fil­ter, the ex­po­sure was in­creased to 15 sec­onds at f22 and ISO 100. Mo­tion in the gondolas is very pro­nounced now and looks re­ally ef­fec­tive. Even the tex­ture in the mov­ing wa­ter has been re­duced and the re­flec­tions of the gondolas are smoothed out.

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