PO­SI­TION A TRI­POD

Learn how to set up for max­i­mum sta­bil­ity and sharp­ness

Digital Photograper - - Techniques -

NO TRI­POD

in this light, even pushing up the isO and open­ing the aper­ture doesn’t get a fast-enough shut­ter speed to en­able hand­hold­ing with­out cam­era shake.

1

EX­TEND THE LEGS start with the top sec­tion and work down. this is best for sta­bil­ity, as the bot­tom sec­tions of some tripods can be quite thin.

2

AD­JUST THE HEIGHT it is best to al­ter the height of the tri­pod by ad­just­ing the legs, as this gives a more sta­ble plat­form than ad­just­ing the cen­tre col­umn.

3

FINE-TUNE THE HEIGHT You can also use the cen­tre col­umn to fine-tune the height, as this is more con­ve­nient, though try to avoid us­ing it on windy days.

4

LEVEL THE TRI­POD Most tripods have a built-in spirit level. use this to set up the tri­pod as level as pos­si­ble. if it is lean­ing, this is likely to re­sult in un­sharp images.

5

COM­POSE YOUR SHOT a good tri­pod head makes com­po­si­tion eas­ier. Geared heads and ball heads with fric­tion con­trol let you make mi­nor ad­just­ments eas­ily.

6

USE A RE­MOTE RE­LEASE Re­lease the shut­ter us­ing a re­mote re­lease. if your cam has a mir­ror, use mir­ror lockup and wait a few sec­onds to al­low vi­bra­tions to die down.

WITH TRI­POD

Work­ing in low light lev­els such as this, you can still shoot at base isO to max­imise im­age qual­ity and stop down the aper­ture to get suf­fi­cient depth of field.

BE­FORE

AF­TER

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