Cre­ate a wet-plate ef­fect

A dig­i­tal quick fix for one of the world’s old­est pho­to­graphic pro­cesses

Digital Photograper - - Contents - DIF­FI­CULTY LEVEL: In­ter­me­di­ate TIME TAKEN: One hour

The wet-plate col­lo­dion process was in­vented by English sculp­tor Fred­er­ick Scott Archer in 1851, and due to its abil­ity to record fine de­tail us­ing rel­a­tively short ex­po­sures (for the day) it went on to rev­o­lu­tionise pho­tog­ra­phy for decades. The tra­di­tional process is still pop­u­lar to­day among a ded­i­cated group of ana­logue pho­tog­ra­phers, pri­mar­ily in the USA, but it’s in­cred­i­bly com­pli­cated; it re­quires the coat­ing of glass plates with home­made emul­sion on lo­ca­tion, so they can be ex­posed while still wet (hence the name) and pro­cessed im­me­di­ately af­ter ex­po­sure. You ba­si­cally have to take a chem­i­cal lab and dark­room ev­ery­where you go, as well as a large-for­mat cam­era!

If that all sounds just a lit­tle too in­volved, you’ll be pleased to know that there’s a dig­i­tal al­ter­na­tive. The pur­pose of this tu­to­rial is to take you through it step by step, from shoot­ing the ini­tial por­trait to fi­nal­is­ing the edited im­age. You do need a ba­sic un­der­stand­ing of Pho­to­shop to mas­ter this tech­nique, but af­ter a few at­tempts you’ll know the steps off by heart and be pro­duc­ing fan­tas­tic wet-plate im­ages ev­ery time.

RightRE­VEAL­ING CHAR­AC­TER THE WET-PLATE EF­FECT LOOKS AMAZ­ING, BUT DONE TRA­DI­TION­ALLY, IT’S VERY COM­PLI­CATED AND TIME-CON­SUM­ING. THE DIG­I­TAL EQUIV­A­LENT IS SO MUCH QUICKER AND EAS­IER AND AS EV­ERY IM­AGE IS DIF­FER­ENT, YOU CAN ADD YOUR OWN PER­SONAL TOUCHALL IM­AGES © LEE FROST

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.