RE­VISIT TRI­POD FEA­TURES

Look closely at your tri­pod man­ual for new ways to use a cam­era sup­port

Digital Photograper - - Techniques -

1 LEG SEC­TIONS

A com­mon er­ror, even among pro­fes­sion­als, is to ex­tend the bot­tom seg­ments first. While this is may seem in­tu­itive, the lower sec­tions have a lower di­am­e­ter and of­fer less sta­bil­ity than the up­per por­tions. Al­ways ex­tend tele­scopic sup­ports from the top down for max­i­mum strength.

2 CEN­TRE COL­UMN

Check to see if your tri­pod has a cen­tre col­umn with a swivel func­tion. Once ro­tated, this will al­low the head to be low­ered much closer to the ground. This of­fers a unique per­spec­tive, with­out hav­ing to re­move the col­umn al­to­gether, of­fer­ing greater speed of oper­a­tion.

3 SAND­BAG AT­TACH­MENT

An of­ten un­derused fea­ture of many tripods, this hook at­tach­ment en­ables a weight to be added to the tri­pod setup, to pro­vide greater sup­port to heav­ier pay­loads. With large cam­eras, a sand­bag lends bet­ter bal­ance, while it pro­tects lighter loads against top­pling due to wind.

4 IN­TER­CHANGE­ABLE FEET

Take a look in the box your tri­pod came in to see if there were any feet re­place­ments bun­dled, or ex­plore the man­u­fac­turer web­site to source these if not. Adapt­ing feet to ter­rain en­ables bet­ter sta­bil­ity – you should at­tach spiked feet in muddy or sandy con­di­tions for ex­am­ple.

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