Un­der the canopy

Sunny ter­races and a soar­ing ceil­ing clad in oak lend this up­dated 1950s Swedish home a sense of nat­u­ral won­der

ELLE Decoration (UK) - - Contents - Words HAN­NAH BOOTH Photography AN­DREA PAPINI/HOUSE OF PIC­TURES Styling ALEXAN­DRA YDHOLM

Sunny ter­races and a soar­ing ceil­ing clad in oak lend this house a sense of nat­u­ral won­der

Acathe­dral-like wooden ceil­ing mir­rors the scale

of the sur­round­ing ev­er­green trees, vis­i­ble from this home’s bal­cony and ter­race. ‘The house feels like a nat­u­ral ex­ten­sion of its sur­round­ings,’ says its owner Peter Grim­vall, who lives here with his wife An­nouk Ruffo Le­duc and their son Os­car (four).

Built in 1958 in Malmö, a city on the south­ern tip of Swe­den, the build­ing was orig­i­nally an un­re­mark­able bun­ga­low with a small 1970s ex­ten­sion. It has been com­pletely trans­formed by Swedish ar­chi­tect Gus­tav Hult­man. He kept the four ex­ter­nal walls and con­structed a new L-shaped up­per floor. Part of this hangs like a mez­za­nine over the kitchen, with the rest open­ing up to cre­ate the nine-me­tre-high ceil­ings above the main liv­ing area.

The ceil­ing, stair­well and first-floor walls are all clad in oak ve­neer pan­els. They help to man­age the vo­lu­mi­nous space. With­out this warm­ing coat of wood, the build­ing could feel cold and lofty. To marry the house’s orig­i­nal and con­tem­po­rary ar­eas, the sleek cladding is mir­rored by square oak par­quet (a pop­u­lar style in the 1950s) on the ground floor. Peter and An­nouk have also recre­ated the house’s orig­i­nal large square win­dows up­stairs, en­cas­ing them in teak to con­trast with the lighter oak.

The in­te­rior fea­tures a mix of Scan­di­na­vian de­sign clas­sics from the 1950s and 1960s, such as Hans J Weg­ner’s ‘ Wish­bone’ chairs for Carl Hansen & Søn, and mod­ern pieces from Ikea. Some of these have been clev­erly hacked – the ‘Sin­nerlig’ din­ing table has had its cork top re­moved and re­placed with the same oak ve­neer pan­els used on the ceil­ing. The cork hasn’t been wasted: it’s now used as a pin­board in Os­car’s bed­room.

But on warm mid-sum­mer days the cou­ple love to be out­doors. As well as an oak-clad ter­race beyond the kitchen, there’s also a bal­cony off of the main bed­room and a sunny fruit and veg­etable patch to the side of the house, which is planted with straw­ber­ries, rhubarb and black­ber­ries. ‘Us­ing the same wood in­side and out­side the house en­sures a con­ti­nu­ity of de­sign,’ says An­nouk. ‘ We feel as though we are liv­ing closer to na­ture.’

TO MARRY THE HOME’S ORIG­I­NAL AND CON­TEM­PO­RARY AR­EAS, THE CLADDING IS MIR­RORED BY OAK PAR­QUET ON THE GROUND FLOOR

Kitchen A large oak is­land, com­plete with cup­boards, sink, open shelv­ing and a black work­top, was cus­tom-made by a lo­cal car­pen­ter. The pat­terned car­pet is an an­tique Chi­nese find (try Frith Rugs for sim­i­lar) De­tails On the side wall, there is an el­e­gant col­lec­tion of Asian arte­facts and art­works, from wicker dishes to ce­ramic pots and prints (try Or­chid Fur­ni­ture). You can find a sim­i­lar Japanese teapot and bam­boo steam­ers at John Lewis

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