There is a nat­u­ral AFFIN­ITY be­tween hu­mans and PA­PER ’

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are do­ing some­thing that you don’t have to ac­tively think about, but it is just enough to stop your mind from rac­ing.’

Although that might ex­plain why de­sign­ers are in­creas­ingly work­ing in this ancient ma­te­rial, it doesn’t quite ex­plain why we want it in our homes, but it comes close. In liv­ing mem­ory, we have touched pa­per all day long, from the di­ary or cal­en­dar that told us our plans for the day to the book we curled up with in bed at night. Now that so many of our daily interactions are dig­i­tal, per­haps we are crav­ing the tac­til­ity of pa­per once again, and so it is find­ing its way into our in­te­ri­ors. ‘Pa­per has been with us for aeons,’ ex­plains vis­ual artist Kubo No­vak ( kubono­vak.com). ‘There is a nat­u­ral affin­ity be­tween hu­mans and pa­per. I love it for its del­i­cacy, its fragility and its al­most in­fi­nite cre­ative pos­si­bil­i­ties.’

As our sur­round­ings be­come in­creas­ingly slick, shiny and screen­based, we yearn for the im­per­fec­tions of nat­u­ral ma­te­ri­als. ‘Peo­ple are drawn to the colour, fin­ish and the warmth of pa­per,’ adds de­signer Liam Hop­kins (laz­e­rian.com). ‘ We are more and more con­scious of the nat­u­ral en­vi­ron­ment and feel a con­nec­tion to that through pa­per.’ You might not have the time to fold 1,000 pa­per cranes, but per­haps a lit­tle more pa­per in your life is all your heart de­sires.

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