Evening Times

War symbol of hope unveiled

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A SCULPTURE built to commemorat­e the First World War is on display in Glasgow.

Ian Forsyth, a 92-year-old Second World War veteran, helped unveil the artwork France 1914, by Simon Burns-Cox, in the People’s Palace.

The six-foot high Italian marble work depicts the last tree on a First World War battlefiel­d and is meant to be a symbol of hope and survival.

Glasgow Museums will exhibit the work across three museums during a three-year loan period, in support of Poppyscotl­and, which provides life-changing support for the Armed Forces community.

After the People’s Palace, the sculpture will be shown at Kelvingrov­e Art Gallery and Museum and Riverside Museum.

Mr Forsyth, who served in the 15th-19th Hussars, said: “I am honoured to be one of the first people to see this magnificen­t sculpture. I encourage people to come and see this thoughtpro­voking work.”

 ?? Pictures: Colin Mearns ?? Ian Forsyth MBE next to the sculpture entitled France 1914 by artist Simon Burns-Cox
Pictures: Colin Mearns Ian Forsyth MBE next to the sculpture entitled France 1914 by artist Simon Burns-Cox
 ??  ?? Ian with artist Simon, Colin Flinn, of Poppy Scotland, and Caroline Barr, from the People’s Palace museum
Ian with artist Simon, Colin Flinn, of Poppy Scotland, and Caroline Barr, from the People’s Palace museum

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