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Focus-Science and Technology - - CONTENTS - DAN JONES,

The gulls we most com­monly see in our UK towns are her­ring gulls. Since the 1960s they have in­creas­ingly been mi­grat­ing in­land, away from their coastal habi­tats, to live and feed: this is largely due to over­fish­ing and the ris­ing sea tem­per­a­tures as­so­ci­ated with cli­mate change (as fish are be­ing forced to greater depths to feed on plank­ton). The gulls scav­enge in land­fill sites and are drawn to ar­eas where we feed them. Al­though of­ten seen as a nui­sance, some species of seag­ulls are now en­dan­gered. With­out hu­mans, their nat­u­ral food sup­ply would re­cover so, on bal­ance, they would be much bet­ter off with­out us.

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