Ap­pro­pri­ate hos­pi­tal ar­chi­tec­ture can play a role in help­ing peo­ple re­cover from ill­ness

Focus-Science and Technology - - CONTENTS -

LIV­ING WITH BUILD­INGS WELLCOME COL­LEC­TION 4 OC­TO­BER 2018 – 3 MARCH 2019

Our homes, work­places and the build­ings we visit can in­flu­ence our health in pow­er­ful ways. These three build­ings have all helped to boost our well­be­ing, and they’re all be­ing fea­tured in the Wellcome Col­lec­tion’s new ex­hi­bi­tion, Liv­ing With Build­ings.

1. FINS­BURY HEALTH CEN­TRE, LONDON

Pre­sented with a hu­man­i­tar­ian brief for a health­care cen­tre to sup­port a de­prived com­mu­nity, ar­chi­tect Berthold Lu­betkin de­signed this free ac­cess, pa­tient­cen­tred build­ing, which opened in 1938 – a decade be­fore the es­tab­lish­ment of the NHS. Lu­betkin created a welcome am­bi­ence us­ing a curved façade, light-filled lobby and easy-to-nav­i­gate lay­out.

2. MAG­GIE’S CEN­TRE, DUNDEE

Ter­mi­nally ill can­cer pa­tient Mag­gie Keswick Jencks be­lieved that can­cer care could be im­proved through good de­sign. Mag­gie’s Cen­tres were de­vel­oped as a con­trast to the harsh, in­sti­tu­tional de­sign of hos­pi­tals, and they’re sit­u­ated near, but never in, ex­ist­ing hos­pi­tals. Like this one in Dundee, de­signed by Frank Gehry and opened in 1996, they cre­ate a friend­lier space for can­cer pa­tients to spend time.

3. PAIMIO SANA­TO­RIUM, FIN­LAND

De­vel­oped in 1929 as a tu­ber­cu­lo­sis sana­to­rium, this build­ing was de­signed by Al­var Aalto to make its own con­tri­bu­tions to the heal­ing process.

He de­signed si­lent basins and strate­gic light­ing so that pa­tients wouldn’t dis­turb each other, and the build­ing in­cluded large bal­conies and a roof deck, as the only known cure at the time was rest, clean air and sun­shine.

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