LOOK­ING BE­YOND THE WALL

LIKE, LIT­ER­ALLY just LOOK­ING

Games TM - - THE GAMES IN FOCUS -

The world on one side of the Iron Cur­tain had – and has – a dis­tinct look from that on the other. Look back at any Cold War pho­tog­ra­phy or film you can find and you’ll see dif­fer­ences – the cars, the streets, the signs. While still a small stu­dio, Cre­ative forge thought it im­por­tant enough to clearly de­fine dif­fer­ences and, while it might not im­pact on how you ac­tu­ally play Phan­tom Doc­trine, you will know (roughly) where you are in the world. Kroenke points out he was ini­tially wor­ried that the art de­part­ment wouldn’t be on board with the ex­tra work, but they knocked it out of the park based on plen­ti­ful treat­ments and mood boards that he pro­vided. This in­flu­enced the di­rec­tion of how the art de­part­ment ap­proached the ac­tual cre­ation of as­sets, and the fin­ished prod­uct ended up with two ma­jor vis­ual styles: eastern and west­ern. “Lev­els on the West­ern hemi­sphere have dif­fer­ent light­ing than the Eastern ones do,” Kroenke ex­plains. “The as­sets look com­pletely dif­fer­ent. You have cars that will look dif­fer­ent, all the signs are in dif­fer­ent lan­guages, so you will get a lot of Rus­sian let­ters on the Eastern side, like in the Eastern bloc, while the West­ern bloc will have most in English or in dif­fer­ent lan­guages. The light­ing is dif­fer­ent, the mood is dif­fer­ent, the ar­chi­tec­ture is dif­fer­ent on both sides. There are def­i­nitely tons of con­se­quences for the art de­part­ment that came from a sim­ple de­ci­sion!”

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