» Twenty top tips to beat the warm weather Health & Life­style

With tem­per­a­tures soar­ing, RACHAEL BLETCHLY re­veals 20 top tips to beat the warm weather

Gloucestershire Echo - - NEWS -

THE heat­wave is on and Bri­tain’s siz­zling. Many hol­i­day-mak­ers can go for a pad­dle, but what about those of us who are left swel­ter­ing at home and work?

The coun­try’s top nurse has warned peo­ple to take pre­cau­tions, with A&E de­part­ments brac­ing them­selves for a rush of heat­stroke, sun­burn, de­hy­dra­tion and al­lergy at­tacks. Chil­dren, those with heart or breath­ing con­di­tions and the el­derly are most at risk.

Here are our 20 heat­wave hacks to sur­vive the siz­zler how­ever long it lasts.

1 WEAR BIG PANTS

LADIES, for­get the lacy thongs and mi­nis, get some comfy Brid­get Jones-style knick­ers in 100% cot­ton. And gents, a heat­wave is the only time boxers are ac­cept­able… with some­thing over them, ob­vi­ously.

2 WEAR A HAT

GET a nifty tit­fer to cut risk of sun­stroke. And invest in sun­glasses that block UV (check the sticker) – or you may risk eye dam­age. You’ll look cooler too.

3 SLAP ON THE SUNCREAM

DON’T go out with­out at least fac­tor 30. If it’s last year’s, check the back for how long it’s ef­fec­tive after open­ing. And stay out of di­rect sun­light when­ever pos­si­ble, espe­cially be­tween 11am and 3pm.

4 WATCH YOUR WEE

IF YOU’RE get­ting enough wa­ter your wee should be clear and pale. Docs say drink three litres a day. Carry a bot­tle – the re­fill.org. uk app lists 20,000 places to fill up for free.

5 EAT LIGHT

DON’T have large, protein-rich meals – a salad keeps you cool as a cu­cum­ber. Eat­ing water­melon is great for cooling you down too.

6 COVER UP

WEAR light, loose-fit­ting clothes. Cot­ton and linen ab­sorb sweat, cooling you quicker, but light­weight 100% wool is great too. Go for light colours. Dark ab­sorbs the light, mak­ing you hot­ter – and show­ing the sweat.

7 DEODORISE

DO US all a favour and avoid pub­lic trans­port un­less you’ve spritzed your pits. Killer B.O. is a heat­wave no-no. Spray the back of your neck too to stop your hair stick­ing.

8 MAKE AN AIR CON­DI­TIONER

PUT your fan be­hind a bowl of ice – as it melts you’ll get a cool waft. If you have a large floor fan, freeze bot­tles of wa­ter and stand them on a towel two feet in front of it.

9 COOL YOUR SHEETS

THE ideal bed­room tem­per­a­ture is 15-19˚C, so sleep­ing has been tough. Use cot­ton sheets and pop them in the freezer in a plas­tic bag for a few hours be­fore bed. Or hang a wet sheet across an open win­dow.

10 AVOID THE BOOZE

TEM­PER­A­TURES may have been in the 30s re­cently but it’s not Pimms o’clock. Booze goes to your head fast in the heat, de­hy­drat­ing you three times quicker and has­ten­ing sun­burn. Too much cof­fee and tea don’t help ei­ther.

11 CIRCULATE THE AIR

KEEP your win­dows, doors and blinds shut dur­ing the day. In the evening, open win­dows and turn one fan to blow air OUT and a sec­ond to bring cooler air in.

12 TAKE LUKEWARM, NOT COLD SHOW­ERS

AN ICE cold shower may cool you off for a few min­utes but it re­duces blood flow to the skin, mak­ing the body think you are cold and rais­ing your core tem­per­a­ture.

13 COOL YOUR PULSE POINTS

FREEZ­ING show­ers might not work but rub­bing ice on your wrists or run­ning them un­der the tap will. Or dunk your arms to the el­bow in cold wa­ter. A 2013 study found it cut heat­stroke in ath­letes work­ing out in the heat.

14 COOL BREATH­ING

IN EAST­ERN medicine the “cooling breath” tech­nique is said to re­lease ex­cess heat. Breathe in through a curled tongue, then out through the nose, for up to five min­utes.

15 SWITCH OFF

LIGHT bulbs, com­put­ers and other ap­pli­ances all gen­er­ate heat, so switch it all off be­fore bed.

16 HAVE A ’99

FOR­GET the diet and treat your­self to an ice cream.

It will bring your tem­per­a­ture down, and the sugar con­tent will re­lieve you of that slug­gish feel­ing.

Make your own ice pops to save some lolly.

17 GET DOWN

HOT air rises, so if all else fails, sleep on the floor, or try sleep­ing down­stairs. Or re­lease your in­ner Tarzan – a ham­mock lets air circulate.

18 BE­WARE HEAT EX­HAUS­TION

HEADACHES, dizzi­ness, a fast pulse and cramp can all be signs of heat ex­haus­tion. If some­one is suf­fer­ing move them to a cool place, get them to lie down and give them plenty of flu­ids. If they’re the same after 30 min­utes, call 111. Keep an eye on the el­derly.

19 LOOK OUT FOR FIDO

DOGS get heat­stroke too. Watch for pant­ing, glazed eyes, rapid heart­beat, dif­fi­culty breath­ing, ex­ces­sive thirst, vom­it­ing and lethargy. Try a cool bath or shower.

20 SOCKS

AMA­ZON flogs freez­able “ice slip­pers” for £15 a pop. Ac­cord­ing to Chi­nese medicine, how­ever, keep­ing feet warm and your head cold reg­u­lates heat. We say what­ever works for you. En­joy the sun safely!

Ditch the diet and get the ice creams in to help keep you cool and beat that slug­gish feel­ing

Let us spray: Re­mem­ber to put on some de­odor­ant

Roll with it: ‘Cool breath­ing’ could be worth a try

Water­melon is a great food for keep­ing cool

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