HEALTH NOTES

Gloucestershire Echo - - HEALTH & LIFESTYLE -

WARN­ING TO REG­U­LAR ASPRIN TAK­ERS AF­TER HEART STUDY

AN as­pirin a day doesn’t nec­es­sar­ily keep heart prob­lems away, a study has shown. The ground­break­ing re­port, car­ried out by the Lon­don branch of the Amer­i­can Col­lege for Car­di­ol­ogy, claims too many peo­ple are pop­ping a daily as­pirin with­out hav­ing any known heart dis­ease or a recommenda­tion from the doc­tor.

Study au­thor Colin O’brien said: “For a lot of us, tak­ing one as­pirin a day brings lit­tle ben­e­fit and a high risk of other health com­pli­ca­tions, such as in­ter­nal bleed­ing. Peo­ple must see their GP for ad­vice.”

EAT­ING EAR­LIER COULD HELP US TO LOSE WEIGHT

DI­ETERS who strug­gle to give up their favourite dishes will be en­cour­aged by re­search that sug­gests eat­ing meals ear­lier can help them shed pounds.

A US study found that over­weight peo­ple eat­ing all three main meals by 2pm burned more fat than when they ate the same food over a longer time. Re­searchers say this could be the key to weight loss with­out hav­ing to change what we eat. Au­thor Eric Ravussin, of Louisiana State Univer­sity, said: “Co­or­di­nat­ing meals with cir­ca­dian rhythms, or your body’s in­ter­nal clock, may be a pow­er­ful strat­egy for re­duc­ing ap­petite and im­prov­ing meta­bolic health.”

VI­TA­MIN D COULD AID CAN­CER SUR­VIVAL

VI­TA­MIN D doesn’t ap­pear to re­duce a per­son’s risk of de­vel­op­ing can­cer, but a daily dose of the sup­ple­ment could up your chances of sur­viv­ing it. When re­searchers at Michi­gan State Univer­sity, US, an­a­lysed data from 10 ran­domised tri­als look­ing at the im­pact of di­etary sup­ple­ments, they found vi­ta­min D does seem to re­duce the risk of dy­ing of can­cer by 13%.

Vi­ta­min D plays a role in reg­u­lat­ing cell growth and scientists sus­pect it helps make can­cer cells less ag­gres­sive.

“The take-home mes­sage is that vi­ta­min D might carry a ben­e­fit for the can­cer pop­u­la­tion,” said Dr Tarek Haykal, one of the re­searchers.

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