HEALTH NOTES

Gloucestershire Echo - - HEALTH & LIFESTYLE -

DON’T GET STRESSED OUT ABOUT FEELING STRESSED

STRESS and anx­i­ety aren’t al­ways bad, ac­cord­ing to lead­ing psy­chol­o­gists.

Ex­perts gath­ered in Chicago to dis­cuss how di­ag­no­sis of the men­tal health con­di­tions are in­creas­ing across Europe and the US.

Much of this is thought to be down to bet­ter di­ag­no­sis.

How­ever the an­nual con­ven­tion of the Amer­i­can Psy­cho­log­i­cal As­so­ci­a­tion heard that greater aware­ness of men­tal ill health can cause prob­lems when cer­tain emo­tional states are viewed as ab­nor­mal.

Psy­chol­o­gist Lisa Damour told: “Many Amer­i­cans now feel stressed about be­ing stressed and anx­ious about be­ing anx­ious.

“Un­for­tu­nately, by the time some­one reaches out to a pro­fes­sional for help, stress and anx­i­ety have al­ready built to un­healthy lev­els.”

Damour in­sisted it is im­por­tant peo­ple un­der­stand that stress can re­sult from both bad and good events.

For in­stance be­ing fired is stress­ful but so is bring­ing a baby home for the first time.

“Stress is a given in daily life,” she said. “It causes harm when it ex­ceeds any level that a per­son can rea­son­ably ab­sorb.”

THE DIET CHANGE THAT COULD HELP CANCER PA­TIENTS

CUT­TING out meat could help cancer pa­tients tackle tu­mours, new research sug­gests, by mak­ing chemo­ther­apy and ra­dio­ther­apy more ef­fec­tive.

The re­searchers fo­cused on re­strict­ing the amino acid me­thio­n­ine, which af­fects me­tab­o­lism and is found in meat, fish and dairy prod­ucts.

When it was cut from ro­dent di­ets, an­i­mals with cancer saw tu­mour growth in­hib­ited. Ini­tial hu­man tri­als sug­gest a sim­i­lar ef­fect.

Study leader Ja­son Lo­casale, of Duke Univer­sity in North Carolina, said: “These find­ings pro­vide ev­i­dence that di­etary ma­nip­u­la­tion can af­fect tu­mour cell me­tab­o­lism.”

Stress can be good for you

Di­etary changes may im­prove the ef­fi­cacy of cancer treat­ments

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