If your re­la­tion­ship breaks down, can you re­gain trust?

Gloucestershire Echo - - HEALTH & LIFESTYLE - WITH DR EL­LIE MILBY Dr El­lie Milby is a coun­selling psy­chol­o­gist

for­ward and whether your trust can be re­gained.

IS THIS A FIRST OF­FENCE?

Every­one makes mis­takes. How­ever, giv­ing some­body a se­cond chance will likely be eas­ier if this is the first time they have bro­ken your trust and their be­hav­iour seems out of char­ac­ter. It’s much harder to sus­tain a re­la­tion­ship where trust is re­peat­edly bro­ken and this be­comes the norm.

WHAT WERE THE PER­SON’S MO­TIVES?

THERE are lots of rea­sons why a per­son might break your trust, some more no­ble than oth­ers.

If you sus­pect their mo­tives were ma­li­cious in any way, then this is go­ing to be harder to fix than if you think they may have acted out of gen­uine care or con­cern.

WHAT ARE YOUR BOUND­ARIES?

SIM­PLY put, your bound­aries are what is ok and what is not ok with you when it comes to your own and other peo­ple’s be­hav­iour.

Thinking back, were you clear about your bound­aries from the out­set so the other per­son knew what was ok and what wasn’t?

Have your bound­aries changed? If you think the bound­aries of the re­la­tion­ship can be rene­go­ti­ated, don’t be afraid to talk to the other per­son and tell them what you want and don’t want from them go­ing for­ward.

Mov­ing for­ward af­ter a breach of trust is hard

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.