A TO BE WANT ‘I WIFE AND GOOD THAT ER – MOTH GIV­ING RES REQUI S UP’ THING

Ni­cole Kid­man is in the midst of a ca­reer re­nais­sance. She tells Grazia why 50 is the new time to flour­ish

Grazia (UK) - - 10 Hot Stories -

SHE MIGHT BE one of Hol­ly­wood’s most bank­able stars – and have just joined In­sta­gram – but Ni­cole Kid­man has long sought to keep her pri­vate life just that: pri­vate. She and hus­band, coun­try mu­sic star Keith Ur­ban, moved to Nash­ville, Ten­nessee, in 2007, where they still live with daugh­ters Sun­day Rose, 10, and Faith, seven, far re­moved from the LA scene.

But last week, per­haps as she was 7,000 miles away from her fam­ily in Shang­hai, as part of her am­bas­sado­rial role with Omega, Ni­cole was in a re­flec­tive mood. ‘ The thing you re­ally learn when you have chil­dren and a ca­reer – and par­tic­u­larly when you’re an older mother – is the pre­cious­ness of time; and there­fore try­ing to bal­ance ev­ery­thing and be will­ing to say no to

things,’ she told Grazia at the launch of the Swiss lux­ury house’s new Con­stel­la­tion watch. The ac­tor says that prin­ci­ple means ev­ery­thing from turn­ing down of­fers of theatre work (‘ The prob­lem is you miss bed­time – and that, for me, is some­thing I’m not will­ing to do’), to putting any thoughts of di­rect­ing on hold (‘I want to be a good wife and I want to be a good mother, so that re­quires giv­ing things up that I want some­times’), all while en­forc­ing firm fam­ily rules. ‘Keith and I are pretty strict with the bound­aries on what we al­low, in terms of work, into our home. I just got the of­fice out of my house and it’s the best thing I’ve ever done. We don’t even have a TV in our bed­room; we’re that cou­ple. And no com­put­ers in the bed.’

Ni­cole in­sists that when she’s not work­ing, she’s just like any other Nash­ville mum – al­beit one with chil­dren who aren’t afraid to let their opin­ions be known. ‘I have two re­ally girly girls. Part of their rules for pick­ing them up from school is that I wear a dress,’ she laughs. ‘ That’s par­tic­u­larly my youngest daugh­ter. I showed up once in my work­out stuff and she was just so em­bar­rassed.’

The anec­dote has a touch of Big Lit­tle Lies about it – the cult book-turned-tv show, in which Ni­cole played a house­wife trapped in an abu­sive re­la­tion­ship, forced to put on a brave face at the school gates. As well as star­ring in it (win­ning a Golden Globe and Emmy for her role as Ce­leste), Ni­cole also pro­duced the se­ries with her friend Reese Wither­spoon. ‘ There’s not enough good roles and we wanted to cre­ate our own roles. So we de­vel­oped it our­selves, we sold it and we pro­duced it and out of it came this huge suc­cess. That was in­cred­i­bly em­pow­er­ing. It was so nice to be in con­trol of our destiny.’

In­deed, some have said the suc­cess of Big Lit­tle Lies is a sign that the Hol­ly­wood glass ceil­ing is be­gin­ning to shat­ter. So, a year on from #Metoo, does Ni­cole feel the in­dus­try has changed? ‘I think there’s been an ex­treme swing of the pen­du­lum in terms of it be­com­ing a part of the con­ver­sa­tion, but has it ac­tu­ally in­sti­gated enor­mous change? ‘No, not yet,’ she says. ‘ There is still a dearth of [fe­male di­rec­tors]. There’s def­i­nitely not par­ity and it’s some­thing that I hope doesn’t get lost now in the con­ver­sa­tion.’

Her forthright­ness is ev­i­dence of why Omega CEO Ray­nald Aeschli­mann says he loves work­ing with Ni­cole. ‘She’s a woman of sub­stance,’ he said. And it’s that sub­stance, and her com­mit­ment to ‘the sis­ter­hood’, that makes Ni­cole pleased they man­aged to per­suade HBO to do a sec­ond sea­son of Big Lit­tle Lies (out next year) and sign up a fe­male di­rec­tor, An­drea Arnold. ‘ We’ve brought in Meryl Streep and we’ve also given re­ally strong sto­ry­lines to Re­nata [Laura Dern] and Bon­nie [ Zoë Kravitz].’ So how did Meryl fit in? ‘She’s so one of the girls, but also a com­plete pro­fes­sional. There’s noth­ing diva about Meryl; she’s there, she’s a worker, she’s com­pletely on time and she is a joy to work with. And we play ad­ver­saries in it,’ she laughs.

Os­car buzz is build­ing around Ni­cole for her role in Boy Erased, in which she plays a mother strug­gling with her son com­ing out as gay. Hol­ly­wood is call­ing it a ‘Kid­manais­sance’. ‘It used to be that when you turned 50, as a woman, it was pretty much your ca­reer could not flour­ish, so to sud­denly have this resur­gence in my ca­reer – so many choices and so many op­por­tu­ni­ties – is a fan­tas­tic thing.’

Ni­cole cred­its her par­ents for rais­ing her to be re­silient enough to make it through 36 years in Hol­ly­wood – a ca­reer that has, of course, in­cluded a very pub­lic di­vorce from Tom Cruise. ‘I try to just go through life, you know, and move for­ward,’ she says. ‘I al­ways try to feel, “OK, well, if this didn’t work out, there’s that, there’s that, there’s that…”’ And, it seems, a lot more where that came from, too. Ni­cole Kid­man is an am­bas­sador for Omega watches; omegawatches.com

KEITH AND I DON’T HAVE A TV IN OUR ROOM – WE’RE THAT COU­PLE

From left to right: Ni­cole in Shang­hai wear­ing one of the new Omega Con­stel­la­tion watches; at the 2018 SAG awards; with hus­band Keith; work­ing along­side Meryl in sea­son two of Big Lit­tle Lies

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