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ONE OF EUROPE’S MOST IM­POR­TANT BATTLEFIELDS HAS BEEN WIDELY WRIT­TEN ABOUT, AND FROM DIF­FER­ENT NA­TIONAL PER­SPEC­TIVES

History of War - - CONTENTS -

The Bat­tle of Water­loo

Water­loo: Myth And Re­al­ity (Barns­ley: Pen & sword Mil­i­tary, 2014) Gareth Glover

Many books were re­leased for the bi­cen­ten­nial of Water­loo, but few were as clearly writ­ten and as chal­leng­ing as Glover’s mono­graph. High­light­ing many myths about the bat­tle, the au­thor pro­vides con­vinc­ing ev­i­dence to sup­port his ver­sion of the events. Four years af­ter its re­lease, this work re­mains an es­sen­tial re­source not only for read­ers who are un­fa­mil­iar with the Bat­tle of Water­loo but also for those who are al­ready ac­quainted with the down­fall of Napoleon.

Water­loo: The Cam­paign Of 1815: Vol­ume I and Vol­ume II John Hussey

This two-vol­ume work pro­vides a de­tailed anal­y­sis of the Hun­dred Days based on sources in four lan­guages. Go­ing into the minds of the com­man­ders and pro­vid­ing sev­eral maps, Hussey of­fers a metic­u­lous ac­count of one of the most im­por­tant cam­paigns in his­tory. It also of­fers a po­lit­i­cal di­men­sion and ex­plains how po­lit­i­cal con­sid­er­a­tions af­fected mil­i­tary op­er­a­tions. This au­thor­i­ta­tive work is sim­ply one of the best ac­counts of the Water­loo cam­paign.

Napoleon, France And Water­loo: The Ea­gle Re­jected Charles Es­daile

The Water­loo cam­paign is al­most al­ways an­a­lysed from a mil­i­tary view­point. In­ter­est­ingly, Charles Es­daile looks at the story from the per­spec­tive of the French home front – an as­pect ne­glected by most English-speak­ing his­to­ri­ans. Draw­ing on ar­chives, di­aries and mem­oirs, his book is a re­fresh­ing ad­di­tion on how 18 June 1815 could have turned out dif­fer­ently. The au­thor ex­am­ines whether a French vic­tory at Water­loo would have changed the course of his­tory. This coun­ter­fac­tual ex­er­cise is use­ful to un­der­stand how mo­ti­vated and pre­pared the French were in 1815.

Water­loo: The French per­spec­tive An­drew Field

In the English-speak­ing world, the story of the Napoleonic Wars is of­ten told from a Bri­tish per­spec­tive. Ex­plor­ing in a me­thod­i­cal man­ner the Hun­dred Days, start­ing with Napoleon’s re­turn from Elba, Field re­lies on more than 90 French ac­counts. This book sheds light on im­por­tant is­sues, such as the Prus­sian in­ter­ven­tion and the Old Guard’s at­tack. This mono­graph is an es­sen­tial read for those who want to look be­yond Bri­tish­cen­tric his­to­ries of the bat­tle.

Water­loo Les Men­songes: Les Ma­nip­u­la­tions De L’his­toire En­fin Révélées Bernard Cop­pens

As can be ex­pected, sev­eral books on the Bat­tle of Water­loo are re­leased ev­ery year in the French-speak­ing world. While most of­fer re­hearsed ar­gu­ments, Cop­pens’s Water­loo Les Men­songes stands out. In this mono­graph, the Bel­gian his­to­rian chal­lenges sev­eral myths and tales fab­ri­cated af­ter the bat­tle. He demon­strates con­vinc­ingly that Napoleon was care­less when plan­ning his strat­egy and failed to con­sider a Prus­sian in­ter­ven­tion. Cop­pens also high­lights how the French em­peror man­aged to re­write the bat­tle while in cap­tiv­ity. Nearly ten years af­ter its re­lease, this book re­mains a mus­tread for those who un­der­stand French.

“A METIC­U­LOUS AC­COUNT OF ONE OF THE MOST IM­POR­TANT CAM­PAIGNS IN HIS­TORY”

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