A STAR IS BORN

History Revealed - - HAVE YOUR SAY -

At time of writ­ing, I am read­ing the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion­ary War ar­ti­cle in is­sue 61 and note the story re­gard­ing the num­ber of points the stars should have on the US flag – I’m glad it added “pos­si­bly apoc­ryphal”. This trig­gered a mem­ory of vis­it­ing the parish church of Steeple in Dorset.

In the church porch, cut in stone, is a coat of arms de­rived from the quar­ter­ing of the arms of the Lawrence fam­ily of Steeple and the Wash­ing­tons – an­ces­tors of Ge­orge Wash­ing­ton. This carv­ing clearly dis­plays the stars as hav­ing five points. Ac­cord­ing to Ge­orge Os­born’s 1986 book Dorset Cu­riosi­ties, Ge­orge Wash­ing­ton wore their arms on his signet ring, thus the num­ber of points on the stars would seem to have been set long be­fore the flag was de­signed. The stripes of said flag would seem to be de­rived from the same coat of arms.

I love the mag­a­zine (I have ev­ery copy from is­sue one and en­joy read­ing it each month. Paula Aubrey, Birm­ing­ham

“The num­ber of points on the stars would seem to have been set long be­fore the flag”

Paula wins a hard­back copy of The Last Weeks of Abra­ham Lin­coln by David Alan John­son, a day-by-day retelling of the pe­riod from his se­cond in­au­gu­ral ad­dress on 4 March 1865 through to his fate­ful trip to Ford’s The­atre on the night of 14 April

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