LIV­ING ROOM

Del­i­cate re­flected light through the win­dow in­spired this calm­ing pal­ette of soft whites and misty hues

Homes & Gardens - - H&G CONTENTS -

A del­i­cate mix of soft whites and misty hues in­spired by re­flected light.

CAN YOU DE­SCRIBE THE PROJECT?

This home in At­lanta, Ge­or­gia, is in a rel­a­tively ur­ban set­ting, but it sits back from the road against a wooded hill­side, giv­ing it a pas­toral feel and pri­vacy on all sides. The rooms were orig­i­nally de­signed with dark panelled walls and floor fin­ishes, but the new own­ers wanted a much lighter pal­ette. To this end, the floor­ing here was re­placed with limed oak and the pan­elling painted to give the whole in­te­rior a facelift.

WHAT WAS THE MAIN IN­FLU­ENCE FOR THE SCHEME?

The room is filled with light all day long, so the de­sign was all about mak­ing the most of this, with a lu­mi­nous and open feel. The ceil­ing was given at least eight coats of high-gloss paint in a misty blue-green shade, re­sem­bling a bur­nished Vene­tian-plas­ter fin­ish. In the af­ter­noon, when the sun­light hits the pool be­yond the log­gia, the re­flected light glim­mers through­out the room. It is this ef­fect, rem­i­nis­cent of the qual­ity of light in Venice, that drove ev­ery aes­thetic de­ci­sion for the scheme.

HOW DO YOU USE COLOUR WHEN WORK­ING WITH SUCH PALE TONES?

When de­sign­ing in­te­ri­ors with a muted pal­ette, it is im­por­tant to cre­ate a soft, sen­sual and or­ganic scheme around it. Ac­cent colours are cru­cial, too: we picked a very dis­tinc­tive pat­terned linen in a sub­tle wa­tery shade for the cur­tains to en­hance the win­dows and add fo­cus to the space, and con­tin­ued the same tones in the sofa cush­ions. The own­ers col­lect blue and white porce­lain and ce­ram­ics from dif­fer­ent eras and cul­tures, so car­ry­ing the blue colour pal­ette through to the fab­rics and fin­ishes made per­fect sense. To fur­ther soften the space, we used a silk and wool rug, which, in cer­tain lights, ap­pears to rip­ple across the floor.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE CHOICE OF FUR­NI­TURE AND AC­CES­SORIES?

The room is large, so we started with a cus­tom-made over­sized sofa and a large seed safe to be used as the cof­fee ta­ble. The an­tique arm­chairs and foot­stool were up­hol­stered in the same chalk-white Bel­gian linen as the sofa to link all the seat­ing and add a con­tem­po­rary edge. Many of the ac­ces­sories have sen­ti­men­tal value to the own­ers. The pair of an­tique ebonised-wood carved pan­els, for ex­am­ple, add tex­ture and strik­ing con­trast to the scheme.

WERE THERE ANY PRACTICALITIES THAT YOU NEEDED TO CON­SIDER?

It was im­por­tant that noth­ing in the room was con­sid­ered too pre­cious, as this is a ‘dogs rule’ house­hold – hence the be­spoke throw that pro­tects the sofa. The clients wanted to in­cor­po­rate a tele­vi­sion into the scheme with­out spoil­ing the over­all look, so it has been tucked into one of the cab­i­nets that flank the fire­place. This trick en­sures that the space is used ex­ten­sively by the fam­ily all year round.

DE­SIGNER

Beth Webb, cre­ative di­rec­tor, Beth Webb In­te­ri­ors, beth­webb.com.

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