BATH­ROOM

Re­turn­ing this his­toric Span­ish prop­erty to its raw state and in­tro­duc­ing tra­di­tion­ally crafted fit­tings, has cre­ated an open-plan bathing space fit for modern sen­si­bil­i­ties

Homes & Gardens - - H&G CONTENTS -

Pared-back el­e­gance for a modern bathing space in an his­toric Span­ish prop­erty.

CAN YOU DE­SCRIBE THE HIS­TORY OF THIS BUILD­ING?

This stun­ning prop­erty, on the Span­ish Costa Brava, started life as two 16th-cen­tury sig­nal tow­ers built to pro­tect the nearby Cas­tle of Ca­longe from pi­rate in­va­sions. The main res­i­dence be­tween the two tow­ers was added in the 17th cen­tury and, within sight of the beach, it is now a week­end es­cape for my clients who have three chil­dren.

HOW DID YOU AL­TER THE LAY­OUT?

The build­ing is of his­toric im­por­tance so we couldn’t touch the tow­ers, but we re­moved in­ter­nal walls and a sec­ond stair­case to turn the first floor into an open-plan bed­room, bath­room and dress­ing space. The re­main­ing stair­case comes up into the main bed­room and is shielded from view by a panelled wall that cre­ates a nat­u­ral divi­sion be­tween the basin area on one side and a shower and WC on the other. In­side one tower we’ve cre­ated a li­brary, while the other hosts shoe stor­age, both with free­stand­ing shelv­ing. The chil­dren’s bed­rooms and shower room are on the ground floor.

WHY DOES THE BATH TAKE CEN­TRE STAGE?

This is one of my per­sonal ob­ses­sions; I hate baths that are set against a wall, en­closed or oth­er­wise hid­den. For me, the bath should al­ways be put on dis­play and Drum­monds’ de­signs are works of art. As our clients love to

bathe, they didn’t need con­vinc­ing. Po­si­tion­ing the sofa next to the bath pro­vides a vis­ual sepa­ra­tion be­tween it and the dress­ing area be­yond, as well as a handy place to leave clothes or to sit and chat.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN SUR­FACES?

We ex­posed many of the stone walls, but there are ele­ments of white-washed plas­ter, around the basin for in­stance, to pro­vide a cleaner, more hy­gienic sur­face. This is also the only place where mar­ble was used – it doesn’t work in most of the house but here it adds an el­e­gant note. The floor­ing is an­tique oak, sourced from the UK. We chose it for its nat­u­ral im­per­fec­tions, but we had a ter­ri­ble job try­ing to ex­plain to the lo­cal work­men that the ir­reg­u­lar­i­ties were de­sired and didn’t need re­pair­ing.

HOW WOULD YOU DE­SCRIBE THE RE­SULTS?

The de­sign style for me is rough lux­ury. There is in­nate au­then­tic­ity in restor­ing a build­ing to its nat­u­ral state. We re­moved decades of crum­bling plas­ter and un­fash­ion­able tiles, took out the ceil­ings and re­in­stated beau­ti­ful old rafters. The sense of space is also lux­u­ri­ous. As a self-con­tained floor, with a slid­ing door at the top of the stairs, there was no need to con­sider pri­vacy. It gave me the free­dom to give the fix­tures the space they de­served in a way that al­lowed them to shine.

A stand-alone wall of limed oak boards hides where the stair­case comes up into the room.

DE­SIGNER

Ana En­gel­horn, di­rec­tor, Ana En­gel­horn, 00 34 659 786451, anaen­gel­horn.com.

A dou­ble mar­ble basin adds el­e­gance and so­phis­ti­ca­tion to the oth­er­wise rus­tic set­ting.

Made by lo­cal car­pen­ters, the wardrobe is painted an earthy Mediter­raneanin­spired green.

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