BED­ROOM

Favourite old pieces com­bine with new ad­di­tions to cre­ate a scheme that ex­udes warmth and calm

Homes & Gardens - - CONTENTS - DE­SIGN­ERS Ni­cole Salvesen and Mary Gra­ham, Salvesen Gra­ham, 020 7967 7777, salvesen­gra­ham.com.

Reused pieces and new ad­di­tions sit har­mo­niously to­gether in this serene space.

NI­COLE, CAN YOU DE­SCRIBE THE SPACE?

This is the mas­ter bed­room in my own home, a Vic­to­rian ter­race in south Lon­don. Un­til re­cently, the house had been used as an ar­chi­tect’s prac­tice, with the bed­room serv­ing as an of­fice. We plan to do con­sid­er­able work to the build­ing at a later stage, but this first phase in­volved re­dec­o­rat­ing the rooms to make them feel wel­com­ing and com­fort­able, while be­ing mind­ful of the bud­get. We also wanted the in­te­ri­ors to have a nat­u­ral feel to re­flect the leafy lo­ca­tion of the house.

WHAT WAS YOUR AP­PROACH TO THE LOOK OF THIS ROOM?

We were keen to reuse pieces from my pre­vi­ous home, although I was con­scious that the rooms here are much larger and so some things needed rescal­ing. The half-tester used to hang above the dou­ble bed in my old guest bed­room, so I let down the drapes to work with the taller ceil­ing. I had new wall lights and read­ing lights in­cor­po­rated into the half-tester, and I reused the head­board and the bed­spread from my pre­vi­ous mas­ter bed­room.

The bed­side chests of draw­ers also came from my former home – they fit per­fectly into the al­coves.

HOW DID YOU EN­SURE THAT THE DIF­FER­ENT PAT­TERNS WORK IN HAR­MONY?

With th­ese pat­terns, there isn’t one de­sign that over­rides the oth­ers, so noth­ing jars. When my busi­ness part­ner Mary and I are reusing pieces, we al­ways like to in­tro­duce some­thing new to re­fresh the scheme, and in this case it is the up­hol­stered bench at the foot of the bed, which has been cov­ered in quite a busy fab­ric. We find it use­ful when pat­terns fea­ture a lot of colours like this one, as they help to tie ev­ery­thing to­gether. The bench also helps to an­chor the bed within this large space.

WHAT OTHER TIPS CAN YOU OF­FER WHEN IT COMES TO US­ING PAT­TERN?

If a scheme has be­come a bit too per­fect, Mary and I like to ‘mess things up’ with some­thing more un­ex­pected. In this in­stance, I in­tro­duced a cush­ion made from a clas­sic Suzani – I love bring­ing some­thing like this into the mix as it makes the room feel more set­tled. The bold silk ikat cush­ion on the bam­boo chair is an­other slightly un­ex­pected pat­tern that adds to the mix beau­ti­fully.

HOW DID YOU DE­CIDE ON THE WALL COLOUR?

Be­cause the room is large, I felt it could take the depth of this dark stone hue, which helps ground the dif­fer­ent colours and pat­terns. I used the same stone colour on the woodwork, in­clud­ing the skirt­ing boards, ar­chi­traves and win­dow frames. By re­duc­ing the el­e­ments, noth­ing is shouting out for at­ten­tion, so the over­all ef­fect is calm­ing, which is par­tic­u­larly good for a bed­room.

AND WHAT ABOUT YOUR CHOICE OF FLOOR­ING?

Mary and I of­ten pre­fer to use sisal rather than car­pet, as it gives a sim­i­lar feel to tim­ber, and we fin­ish it off with a rug. The rug is an in­cred­i­bly soft flatweave that is won­der­ful un­der­foot; it brings an­other pat­tern to the scheme, ton­ing with the blues of the dif­fer­ent fab­rics.

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