LOOM BANNED

IN THE PUR­SUIT OF TIDINESS AND MIN­I­MAL WEIGHT LOSS, PROJECT 5 HAS UN­DER­GONE A LIT­TLE IN­TER­NAL SURGERY...

Japanese Performance - - THE GARAGE -

Bare ne­ces­si­ties, the simple bare ne­ces­si­ties. If it's good enough for Baloo the bear, then it's def­i­nitely got to be good enough for my Project 5, and now that every lux­ury known to man has been re­moved from the light­weight 5, that's ex­actly what we're left with. Re­mov­ing heavy­weight items like the air con unit and dash is al­ways the best place to start if you're plan­ning on build­ing a ded­i­cated track car, but with all the plugs and switches still float­ing around in the cock­pit it makes per­fect sense to get into the loom and re­move any of the as­so­ci­ated wires that are no longer needed, too. Strip­ping parts from the loom is not a job for the faint hearted, though, and as I've found out in the past to my peril, its best to trace each wire back me­thod­i­cally be­fore chop­ping it out. Test­ing your electrics as you go is al­ways a good idea as the earth and live con­nec­tions are usu­ally shared by sev­eral of the com­po­nents through­out the cock­pit, and snip­ping the wrong one in­evitably ends in tears. In the end, though, the re­sult is well worth all the panic and not only does the surgery tidy every­thing up from an aes­thetic point of view, but with more wire stripped out of the car comes a lit­tle more weight shaved off the to­tal fig­ure (okay, maybe I'm push­ing it now).

While con­cen­trat­ing on the in­te­rior, I also fit­ted my newly flocked dash bin­na­cle that had made its way back from Ron Fox at The Flock Shop. I've been us­ing Ron for years to cover parts in the fuzzy felt and, as usual, the qual­ity of fin­ish was spot on. When I went to fit the bin­na­cle back in, though, I

came across a cou­ple of prob­lems I hadn't en­vis­aged. The main prob­lem was that there was now noth­ing to hold the damn thing in place. As the dash was no longer where it should be, the clips that se­cure the bin­na­cle and the speedo unit to­gether were no longer there to help. So, with a bit of head scratch­ing and a check in my parts bin, I de­cided the best op­tion was to drill a cou­ple of holes through the bin­na­cle and bolt the two parts to­gether at the bot­tom. I then used Tiger Seal to fix a cou­ple of pieces of wood to the back to act as a new bracket and they now hold every­thing to­gether per­fectly. It may seem a lit­tle ghetto at first sight, but it does the job per­fectly and every­thing is hid­den out of sight.

One thing that did make my heart sink this month, though, was the sight of a clump of rusty metal sit­ting next to my car when I en­tered the garage. On fur­ther in­spec­tion, it turned out to be due to some­thing that no MX-5 owner wants to hear... rusty sills. I started prod­ding about and from what I thought was a solid, well re­paired sill fell a huge lump of rust and filler that had ob­vi­ously been bodged in place a cou­ple of years ago. To say I was a lit­tle peeved is the un­der­state­ment of the cen­tury and it just adds yet an­other job to the ever grow­ing list of 'to dos'. Th­ese things are sent to test us though and I sup­pose at the very least it means that I can now have both sills re­paired prop­erly once and for all and I won't have to worry about them again in the fu­ture!

Here’s hop­ing that the red rot stops here! – Matt

The Flock Shop www.the­flock­shop.co.uk Tel: 07951 241555

WITH NO DASH­BOARD TO HIDE THEM, WIRES NEED TO BE NEAT AND MIN­I­MAL. THIS WAS THE SPAGHETTI-LIKE OEM LOOM BE­FORE RE­MOV­ING UNNEEDED WIRES

A FEW HOURS OF TAPING LATER AND THE STREAM­LINED LOOM LOOKS MUCH BET­TER, AS DOES THE FLOCKED IN­STRU­MENT BIN­NA­CLE BY THE FLOCK SHOP

THE BIN­NA­CLE AND LOOM IS NOW BACK IN THE CAR. UN­FOR­TU­NATELY, THE DREADED RED ROT HAS RISEN ITS HEAD AND THE MX-5’S SILLS ARE TOAST

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