HINDSIGHTS OF THE RICH AND THE FA­MOUS

BENJI and JOEL run the rule over the GOOD CHAR­LOTTE cat­a­logue and try their best to pick a favourite…

Kerrang! (UK) - - Cover Story -

THE YOUNG AND THE HOPE­LESS (2002)

BENJI: “I would have to put this first be­cause of what we be­came. If not for that record and that mo­ment, we would not be here to­day. So I give it a lot of credit for all the things we went on to.”

JOEL: “When you lis­ten to ev­ery other pop-punk record at the time, we put a lot of ef­fort into the dif­fer­ent sounds and it felt like it broke some bound­aries. I take a lot of pride in the crafts­man­ship.”

GEN­ER­A­TION RX (2018)

BENJI: “I know ev­ery band say it about their new one, but I gen­uinely be­lieve this is the best record we’ve ever made. It’s the most co­he­sive body of work.”

JOEL: “We’re more us than we’ve ever been. We’re stronger and more fo­cused. We’ve found a way back to those kids who made The Young And The Hope­less and to in­te­grate those kids with the grown men we are to­day. We found a way that they can help and teach each other.”

GOOD MORN­ING RE­VIVAL (2007)

JOEL: “I feel like when ev­ery­body wanted us to do an­other record like the one we’d just done, we found a way to make a record we’d never made.”

BENJI: “There was some­thing that hap­pened there where we be­came a lit­tle bul­let­proof as peo­ple. That record was re­ally crit­i­cised [at the time]. We re­ally had to stick to our guns when it came out.”

THE CHRON­I­CLES OF LIFE AND DEATH (2004)

JOEL: “We were try­ing to push the bound­aries at a time when ev­ery­one just wanted The An­them or an­other Life­styles Of The Rich And Fa­mous.”

BENJI: “We said, ‘No, we aren’t just go­ing to re­hash some­thing for suc­cess, we’re go­ing to try to dig deeper.’ And we ended up hav­ing some mo­ments on that record I’m re­ally proud of. I Just Wanna Live is still one of my favourites.”

CAR­DI­OL­OGY (2010)

BENJI: “There’s some­thing spe­cial about that record and I don’t know what it is yet, but I know it’s go­ing to be revealed to us later in life. It was an im­por­tant record for us.”

JOEL: “Ev­ery­thing changed. The en­tire busi­ness had changed and we were left out there on our own. I was proud of how we han­dled our­selves on that record.”

BENJI: “There was so much hu­mil­ity on that record. I’m grate­ful for that.”

GOOD CHAR­LOTTE (2000)

BENJI: “That was us at our bright­est and most in­no­cent, when we were just want­ing to make a re­ally good record and be in a big band. When you hear the ef­fort on there… We weren’t re­ally a great band yet, but we were on our way. We had a few tours, and pretty much zero ex­pe­ri­ence, but I look back on that time now with a lot of love.”

JOEL: “We were so starry-eyed back then, man.”

YOUTH AUTHOR­ITY (2016)

BENJI: “This al­bum was like get­ting back to bat and find­ing out if we could still hit the ball.”

JOEL: “We came into this busi­ness as poor kids from nowhere, and we walked away for a while with a cou­ple of bro­ken legs, but we came back and we started find­ing our swing. It was a lot of fun, there were some jams and it let us play live again, but it wasn’t writ­ten from the same place of hon­esty as Gen­er­a­tion Rx.”

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