Landscape (UK)

SNOWDROPS AT HIGHER CHERUBEER

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While living in Buckingham­shire, Jo got to know a group of galanthoph­iles: a term used to describe snowdrop enthusiast­s. Included among them were the eminent galanthoph­iles Richard Nutt and Primrose Warburg. Since then, Jo has had a fascinatio­n for these small but very special plants and has even bred varieties of her own, named after her children, Daisy and Jack. “I love breeding and growing plants on, because I’m naturally inquisitiv­e,” she says. There are approximat­ely 400 named cultivars in the garden at Higher Cherubeer, including some that flower as early as September, such as Queen Olga’s snowdrop, Galanthus reginae-olgae subsp. reginae-olgae.

Jo’s favourite snowdrops include:

‘S. Arnott’: “It smells wonderful and makes big, robust clumps,” she explains.

‘Trumps’: “An interestin­g flower, with green marks on the tips of its outer petals.”

‘Fly Fishing’: “A tall, elegant snowdrop that starts flowering in January.”

‘Madeleine’: “The best performing yellow form for me: it clumps up nicely.”

Galanthus ikariae: “An excellent late snowdrop, with very green inner petals, which can still be in flower in April. I’m attempting to make a carpet of it using plants grown from seed I got from the Alpine Garden Society.”

The social side of collecting snowdrops also appeals to Jo. “It’s fun having get-togethers in the winter months, visiting snowdrop gardens and swapping plants,” she says. “Having a carpet of Galanthus nivalis, though it would look spectacula­r, just wouldn’t be the same as having lots of different and unusual varieties.”

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 ??  ?? Galanthus ‘Madeleine’, a beautiful single snowdrop, has a yellow ovary and inner segment markings.
Galanthus ‘Madeleine’, a beautiful single snowdrop, has a yellow ovary and inner segment markings.
 ??  ?? The colourful stems of an avenue of Salix
alba var. vitellina ‘Britzensis’ catch the sunlight, with snowdrops and
Cyclamen coum at their base.
The colourful stems of an avenue of Salix alba var. vitellina ‘Britzensis’ catch the sunlight, with snowdrops and Cyclamen coum at their base.

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