ALSO SHOW­ING

Llanelli Star - - FILM REVIEWS -

PRE­VIEW: AN­I­MALS (15)

SIS­TERLY sol­i­dar­ity is tested to break­ing point in a booze-soaked dark com­edy adapted from the novel by Emma Jane Unsworth.

Laura (Hol­l­i­day Grainger, pic­tured) en­joys the nightlife in present-day Dublin to ex­cess with Amer­i­can best friend Tyler (Alia Shawkat). They of­ten wake in the same bed and are in­sep­a­ra­ble as they chart a hap­haz­ard path through their early 30s.

When Laura falls in love with clas­si­cal pi­anist Jim (Fra Fee), she con­tem­plates turn­ing her back on the par­ties, drugs and de­bauch­ery to set­tle down and fol­low the sen­si­ble, sub­ur­ban ex­am­ple of her sis­ter Jean (Amy Mol­loy).

Tyler is deeply re­sent­ful of Jim and schemes to break up the happy cou­ple by tempt­ing her best friend to stray with writer Marty (Der­mot Mur­phy).

Tyler’s ef­fort to break Laura’s heart rather than sever their bond could backfire spec­tac­u­larly.

■ Screen­ing in selected cin­e­mas.

HOR­RI­BLE HIS­TO­RIES: THE MOVIE – ROT­TEN RO­MANS (PG)

★★★ ★★

BASED on Terry Deary’s pop­u­lar chil­dren’s book se­ries, Hor­ri­ble His­to­ries: The Movie – Rot­ten Ro­mans strug­gles to repli­cate the breezy, mad­cap tone of the long-run­ning TV se­ries.

In 54 AD, en­ter­pris­ing Ro­man teenager Atti (Se­bas­tian Croft) earns the gold coins he needs to buy a new pair of san­dals by pass­ing off a vial of horse urine as pre­cious glad­i­a­tors’ per­spi­ra­tion.

Nero (Craig Roberts) re­ceives the bot­tle as a present and seeks a fit­ting pun­ish­ment for Atti’s de­cep­tion. “I’ll send you to Bri­tain,” snarls the em­peror and he con­demns the weak­ling to serve as a cen­tu­rion un­der Dec­imus (Lee Mack).

Far from home, Atti meets feisty Celt teenager Orla (Emilia Jones, pic­tured), whose tribe are part of a re­bel­lion against the Ro­man em­pire led by fame-hun­gry Boudicca (Kate Nash), queen of the fear­less Iceni.

Atti and Orla de­velop a touch­ing friend­ship and work to­gether in the hope of send­ing the Ro­mans back home with their spears be­tween their legs.

THE CUR­RENT WAR (12A)

★★ ★★★

THE year is 1880 and Thomas Edi­son (Benedict Cum­ber­batch, pic­tured) is poised to light up a sec­tion of New York with his elec­tri­cal sys­tem, aided by per­sonal sec­re­tary Samuel In­sull (Tom Hol­land).

The grand un­veil­ing is a rous­ing suc­cess, how­ever, Edi­son’s re­liance on di­rect cur­rent makes it ex­pen­sive and labour-in­ten­sive to con­vey cur­rent over long dis­tances.

Busi­ness­man George West­ing­house (Michael Shannon) senses an op­por­tu­nity. He be­lieves that an al­ter­nat­ing cur­rent sys­tem could be cheaper and more ef­fi­cient. The two men trade ver­bal blows as their re­spec­tive busi­nesses duel for supremacy.

Sadly, di­rec­tor Al­fonso Gomez-Re­jon’s turgid pe­riod drama fails to light up the big screen.

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