Cap­tain wrote to mum to tell of Mil­i­tary Medal award

Sgt Coul­son’s body was never found THROUGH­OUT the cen­te­nary of the First World War, we have been re­mem­ber­ing the sol­diers from the Lough­bor­ough area who lost their lives while serv­ing their coun­try.

Loughborough Echo - - LOOKING BACK -

Here, with the help of Marigold Cleeve and a small num­ber of re­searchers from the Lough­bor­ough Car­il­lon Tower and War Me­mo­rial Mu­seum, we look back at more of those who made the ul­ti­mate sac­ri­fice in May 1918. Ernest Lind­sey.

Ernest Lind­sey was born in the sum­mer of 1889 in Lough­bor­ough and bap­tised on 8th Jan­uary 1890 at All Saints Church, Lough­bor­ough.

He was one of 16 chil­dren of Ge­orge Lind­sey and his wife Char­lotte (née Sharpe) who were mar­ried on 14th Novem­ber 1880 at All Saints Church, Lough­bor­ough.

Only four of the 16 chil­dren sur­vived in­fancy and Ernest had two broth­ers Tom and Arthur and one sis­ter El­iz­a­beth.

He also had a half-brother Wil­liam Sharpe (af­ter­wards Lind­sey), born be­fore his mother mar­ried Ge­orge Lind­sey.

When Ernest was born his fa­ther was a labourer and a boat­man and he later be­came just a brick maker’s labourer.

Be­tween 1891 and 1901 the Lind­sey fam­ily lived in John Street, Lough­bor­ough, firstly at No. 19 and then at No. 21. Ernest’s par­ents later moved to 13 Fen­nel Street.

By 1911 Ernest was a Driver with the 81st Bat­tery of the Royal Field Ar­tillery (RFA) and was sta­tioned in Kir­kee (now Khad­khi), a town near Pune, Ma­ha­rash­tra, In­dia.

By the time war broke out he is likely to have been a Re­servist and re­called. His ser­vice pa­pers have not sur­vived but it is known that he was sent to France on 5th Novem­ber 1914 to join the 28th Brigade, Royal Field Ar­tillery, as Driver 52880. In 1914 the 28th Brigade, part of the 5th Divi­sion of the Army, con­sisted of 122nd 123rd 124th Bat­ter­ies and the 28th Brigade Am­mu­ni­tion Col­umn.

Driv­ers in the RFA cared for and main­tained the horses, har­ness and wag­ons needed to move the ar­tillery pieces around the bat­tle­field. Each driver con­trolled a team of (up to) six horses from a mounted po­si­tion on the lead, off­side horse and it was a spe­cial­ist qual­i­fi­ca­tion.

In early Novem­ber 1914, when Ernest joined the 28th Brigade of the RFA, it was in ac­tion in the line at Lin­den­hoek. Much of the work here was short search­ing fire on and be­hind the Messines-Wytschaete Ridge.

On 2nd De­cem­ber their gun ‘Black Maria’ fired at the south­ern slopes of Mount Kem­mel and the brigade con­tin­ued in ac­tion at Lin­den­hoek and Neuve Eglise un­til 7th April 1915.

On 8th and 9th April the brigade marched from Dra­noutre to Ypres and the guns were reg­is­tered on the fol­low­ing day.

On 17th April the bat­ter­ies opened heavy fire to sup­port an in­fantry at­tack and were sub­se­quently in­volved in the 2nd Bat­tle of Ypres from 22nd April -25th May.

On 16th July the brigade moved into ac­tion near Dicke­busch and on the night of 25th/26th July trans­ferred to Hon­deghem to rest.

On 30th July the brigade en­trained at Cas­sel for Méri­court l’Abbé and marched to bil­lets in Bon­nay. On 3rd and 4th Au­gust the brigade pro­ceeded to Treux and all bat­ter­ies were or­dered into ac­tion.

On 27th Au­gust the brigade went into Army Re­serve at Sailly-le-Sec but re­turned into ac­tion in the area of Bray on 15th Septem­ber. The brigade re­mained in that area un­til 20th Jan­uary 1916.

From 21st Jan­uary to 24th Fe­bru­ary 1916 the brigade was rest­ing at Saint Gra­tien and at St. Sau­veur, near Amiens. On 25th Fe­bru­ary they marched to Longuevil­lette, near Doul­lens in a snow bl­iz­zard and on 28th moved to Beau­dri­court. The brigade was in con­tin­u­ous ac­tion near Ar­ras from 2nd March to 23rd June when it was or­dered to Beaumetz.

From 3rd-13th July the bat­ter­ies were redrilling be­fore mov­ing via Outre­bois, Puchvillers and Quer­rieu to Heilly.

On 20th July the brigade moved into ac­tion west of Mon­taubon, south of the Carnoy-Mon­taubon road and on 21st July heav­ily shelled Cater­pil­lar Wood. In the fol­low­ing days there was fur­ther heavy shelling in the ar­eas of Delville Wood and Longue­val.

The brigade con­tin­ued with a pro­gramme of fir­ing east of Delville Wood, on the west edge of Ginchy, on Guille­mont and on Ber­nafay Wood and Trȏnes Wood un­til 5th Septem­ber.

The brigade then marched to the wagon lines near Al­bert, and thence to the wagon lines at La Neuville be­fore pro­ceed­ing to a rest camp at Ault.

At the be­gin­ning of Oc­to­ber, af­ter a few days ac­tion north-east of Delville Wood, the brigade moved over five days from Bussy-lesDaours via Beau­court, Am­plies, Bou­bers-sur-Canche and Heuchin to Lo­con. They then went into the line at Le Touret, and in the area of Halpe­garbe and Neu­veChapelle. Reg­u­lar bom­bard­ments con­tin­ued over Christ­mas un­til 30th De­cem­ber when the bat­ter­ies were re­lieved.

In Jan­uary 1917 the 28th Brigade, which had now be­come an Army Brigade, was at Gorre, east of Béthune, be­fore mov­ing into ac­tion in the area of La Bassée.

In Fe­bru­ary the brigade, part of the Left Group, 5th Di­vi­sional Ar­tillery, was firstly at Gorre and then at Le Touret, east of La Bassée. In March the brigade was mainly south-east of Béthune at An­nequin, Loisne and Lo­con, be­fore mov­ing slightly west to Ver­drel.

In April, from Ver­drel the brigade trans­ferred to Aux Ri­etz, north of Lens, be­fore re­turn­ing south to Bois de la Ville in Maroeuil, north-west Ar­ras.

From here they be­came part of the ar­tillery for the Cana­dian as­sault on Vimy Ridge. In the sec­ond half of May they moved to Bois de Far­bus be­tween Lens and Ar­ras and re­mained here un­til Au­gust when they trans­ferred to Thieushouck and then to Halle­bast, hav­ing been at­tached to the XI Corps of the Por­tuguese Divi­sion.

Au­gust ended at Canal Lock 7, south of Ypres, and in the area of the Vic­to­ria mine shaft.

From 2nd-5th Septem­ber the brigade was in ac­tion on the Ypres to Comines Canal front, bom­bard­ing and shelling the canal banks and the Dam­strasse, a sunken road south of St. Eloi run­ning east from Ri­jsel­straat to the grounds of White Chateau.

Af­ter A Bat­tery’s po­si­tion at Arun­del and Nor­folk Lodge was shelled by the en­emy on 5th Septem­ber the brigade with­drew to the wagon lines at Poper­inghe. While they were at Poper­inghe the di­vi­sional am­mu­ni­tion col­umn was bombed.

On 13th Septem­ber the brigade re­turned to ac­tion sup­port­ing in­fantry brigades at Klein Zille­beke and on 15th Septem­ber took part in var­i­ous bar­rages.

The en­emy re­tal­i­ated by shelling Spoil­bank to St Eloi, and bomb­ing Voormezele (be­tween Dicke­busch and St Eloi), fol­lowed by a gas at­tack.

The brigade shelled Bas­seville­beek on 20th Septem­ber in sup­port of in­fantry ac­tion at Hill 60 and con­tin­ued with day and night bar­rages from Lock 7 un­til 20th Oc­to­ber.

On 21st Oc­to­ber the brigade with­drew to Poper­inghe and for the rest of Oc­to­ber and most of Novem­ber was sta­tioned at Proven, part of the time be­ing used for sal­vaging guns from the Steen­beck.

In early De­cem­ber, while the brigade was in the wagon lines at St. Sixte Ger­man bomb­ing killed sev­eral men and many horses. On 6th De­cem­ber the brigade moved to Haan­dekot, west of Poper­inghe.

In Jan­uary 1918 the brigade was at Lange­marck and in Fe­bru­ary at Bix­choote.

On 11th March 1918 they trans­ferred to Gournier Farm, near Haze­brouck. In early April they moved from Gournier Farm to Square Farm and then to north of Pradelles.

Af­ter the Bat­tle of Haze­brouck (12th-15th April) the brigade moved to Borre near Haze­brouck.

Ernest was killed in ac­tion near Haze­brouck on 22nd May 1918, aged 27.

He was buried in Cinq Rues Bri­tish Ceme­tery, Grave D 20. Cris Bur­rows Cot­ton.

Cris Bur­rows Cot­ton was born in Swan­wick, Der­byshire, on 9th July 1899 and bap­tised on 27th Au­gust 1899 at St. An­drew’s Church, Swan­wick.

He was the el­dest child of Crispi­anus Cot­ton and his wife Sarah Ann (née Vardy) who were mar­ried on 5th Oc­to­ber 1898 at St. An­drew’s Church, Swan­wick.

In 1901 the Cot­ton fam­ily was liv­ing at The Green, Al­fre­ton, Der­byshire, and Cris’s fa­ther was the man­ager of a Co-op gro­cery stores. By 1906 the fam­ily had moved to Rid­dings, Der­byshire, and in 1910 moved again to 61 Toothill Road, Lough­bor­ough.

In 1917 the Cot­ton fam­ily was liv­ing at Cr­isholme, For­est Road. In Lough­bor­ough Cris’s fa­ther ran a gro­cer’s shop and his wife as­sisted in the busi­ness.

Cris had four broth­ers Fred,

Charles, Ge­orge and Ken­neth.

When he left school Cris be­came an es­ti­mat­ing clerk. On 7th July 1917, two days be­fore his eigh­teenth birth­day, he en­listed at Lough­bor­ough.

Mo­bilised on the fol­low­ing day he was posted to the 7th Bat­tal­ion of the Sher­wood Foresters (Notts & Derby Reg­i­ment) as Pri­vate 95924.

Af­ter train­ing Cris was sent to France on 2nd April 1918 to join the 1st Bat­tal­ion of the Sher­wood Foresters. He joined them at Hangest-enSan­terre where the bat­tal­ion was un­der­go­ing re­or­gan­i­sa­tion.

On 12th April the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Hangest for St. Roche sta­tion, Amiens, and marched into Corps Re­serve at Quer­rieu. On 15th April they moved to Blangy and two days later to BlangyTronville.

On 19th April the bat­tal­ion went into the front line trenches at Villers-Bret­toneaux.

Re­lieved on 23rd April they marched to Blangy-Tronville but on the fol­low­ing day were or­dered to march to Blangy Wood and at­tack Villers-Bre­ton­neaux.

The bat­tal­ion met the en­emy in the Bois l’Abbé where a line was taken up. They held this line for three days and suc­ceeded in ex­tend­ing it by 630 yards to the right.

Re­lieved on the even­ing of 27th the bat­tal­ion marched to bivouac in Blangy Wood.

On the fol­low­ing day they pro­ceeded to bil­lets in Ca­mon to clean up and rest.

On 2nd May, af­ter an overnight stay in bil­lets in Clairy-Saul­choix, the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Saleux sta­tion for Fismes and marched to huts south-west of Chéry-Char­treuse.

Train­ing took place at Chéry on 7th and 8th May, fol­lowed by a three-day move via Mag­neux and Rucy to take up the sup­port po­si­tion at Ju­vin­court.

The bat­tal­ion then held the front line from 17th-24th May but af­ter be­ing re­lieved had only been in rest bil­lets at Ven­te­lay for two days when they were or­dered for­ward to Roucy and then to the Aisne line.

The Al­lies had just re­ceived in­for­ma­tion about an im­pend­ing Ger­man at­tack.

On 27th May, the first day of the 3rd Bat­tle of the Aisne, the bat­tal­ion suf­fered heavy ca­su­al­ties and Cris, still only aged 18 and who had just been pro­moted to the rank of Lance Cor­po­ral (un­paid) went miss­ing.

He was pre­sumed to have been killed in ac­tion on or af­ter 27th May 1918.

Cris is com­mem­o­rated on the Sois­sons Me­mo­rial, Aisne.

He is also re­mem­bered on the me­mo­rial in All Saints Church, Lough­bor­ough, and on the Car­il­lon.

Al­bert Ernest Coul­son.

Al­bert Ernest Coul­son was born in late 1896 in Long What­ton.

He was the son of James Wil­more Coul­son and his wife An­nie (née Brooks) who were mar­ried at St. Peter’s Church, Church Lang­ton, near Mar­ket Har­bor­ough, on 22nd Novem­ber 1886.

When Al­bert’s par­ents were mar­ried his fa­ther was a groom, but he later be­came a coach­man and then a cab driver.

Al­bert had five broth­ers John, Ge­orge, Fred­er­ick, Wal­ter and Arthur, and four sis­ters El­iz­a­beth, Lois, Florence and Ruth. An­other sib­ling had died young.

In 1901 the Coul­son fam­ily was liv­ing at What­ton House Lodge, Derby Road, Long What­ton, but by 1911 had moved to High Street, Keg­worth.

Be­tween 1911 and 1915 Al­bert’s par­ents moved to 12 Shakespeare Street, Lough­bor­ough.

Al­bert en­listed at Lough­bor­ough in May 1915 and joined C Coy of the 7th (Ser­vice) Bat­tal­ion of the Le­ices­ter­shire Reg­i­ment as Pri­vate 18397.

His ser­vice record has not sur­vived but ex­tant records show that, af­ter pre­lim­i­nary train­ing, he was sent to France on 15th De­cem­ber 1915.

In De­cem­ber 1915 the 7th Le­ices­ters were in­volved in var­i­ous trench war­fare ac­tiv­i­ties in the area of Ar­ras.

The freez­ing weather of Jan­uary 1916 made life dou­bly dif­fi­cult and in Fe­bru­ary they were re­quired to take over ex­tra trench ar­eas va­cated by the French who were con­cen­trat­ing every ef­fort at the Bat­tle of Ver­dun.

These new trenches even­tu­ally in­cluded those in front of Bailleul­ment to the left of ex­ist­ing po­si­tions and to the right as far as far as Han­nescamps. At the same time the en­emy re­dou­bled its ef­forts in shelling Ber­les-auBois. When not in the trenches the 7th Le­ices­ters re­ceived in­ten­sive train­ing in bomb­ing, Lewis gun­nery, vis­ual sig­nalling and a host of other ac­tiv­i­ties.

In April they were moved to the Doul­lens area and formed work­ing par­ties to cut down trees and pre­pare brush­wood for the front line as well as re­pair­ing the sup­port trenches in the area.

In May they worked on build­ing a new rail­way line be­tween Le Bret and Bienvillers-au-Bois. Men not build­ing the rail­way were in the trenches.

To­wards the end of May the en­tire bat­tal­ion re­turned to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleul­mont area. At the be­gin­ning of July 1916 the 7th Bat­tal­ion moved on to the Somme. They were at Fri­court on 13th July and at Mametz Wood and in the at­tack on Bazentin-le-Petit on 14th July.

Re­lieved from Mametz Wood on 16th July the bat­tal­ion pro­ceeded to Fri­court and then on to Ribbe­mont.

On 20th July they be­gan a three day move by train and route march to Moncheux, and two days later marched on to bil­lets at Beau­fort. On 28th July the bat­tal­ion moved again to Agnez-lesDuisans, near Ar­ras, for com­pany train­ing and on 6th Au­gust took over a sec­tion of bat­tered trenches there.

The com­pa­nies of the bat­tal­ion took turns in trench work.

On 4th Septem­ber the bat­tal­ion marched to De­nier. Af­ter 10 days train­ing at De­nier and Sars-le-Bois the bat­tal­ion en­trained for the Somme on 12th Septem­ber and bivouacked out­side Mon­tauban, north-east of Ber­nafay Wood.

On 25th Septem­ber they fought very bravely and suc­cess­fully at Gueude­court in an ac­tion which was part of the Bat­tle of Mor­val. On 4th Oc­to­ber the bat­tal­ion en­trained once more for the north and the coun­try­side of Loos, tak­ing over po­si­tions op­po­site the Ho­hen­zollern Re­doubt with rest bil­lets at Mazin­garbe, Philosophe, or Ver­melles.

Train­ing at Cauchy-à-la­Tour and Houtk­erque fol­lowed from 20th De­cem­ber 1916 un­til 12th Fe­bru­ary 1917.

On 13th Fe­bru­ary the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Proven for Fou­querieul and marched to bil­lets in the tobacco fac­tory in Béthune.

Mov­ing on to Labourse they were back in the trenches in the Ho­hen­zollern sec­tor on 15th Fe­bru­ary, mov­ing up to the front line on 21st Fe­bru­ary. Breaks from the trenches were taken in Noyelles.

In March 1917 the bat­tal­ion ex­pe­ri­enced what one soldier called ‘the bom­bard­ment of our lives’. On 29th March the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Noyelles for Saulty-L’Ar­bret and marched to La Cauchie and on to Moyenville. On 4th April the bat­tal­ion went into the front line at St. Leger Croisilles, with breaks at Moyenville.

From 15th to 23rd April the bat­tal­ion was in train­ing at Bailleul­val be­fore re­turn­ing to the trenches at St. Leger Croisilles.

On 28th April the bat­tal­ion was in ac­tion at the Bat­tle of Ar­leux and on 3rd May in re­serve for the 2nd Bat­tle of Bul­le­court, mov­ing into the front line on 4th May.

From 4th -11th May the bat­tal­ion suf­fered from very heavy en­emy shelling.

From 12th-31st May the bat­tal­ion was with­drawn for train­ing at Bienvillers. Fur­ther train­ing and trench tours fol­lowed in the Moyenville area in June, July and Au­gust, fol­lowed by a break in Hamelin­court. On 25th and 26th Au­gust the bat­tal­ion marched to Gouy-en-Ar­tois and then Beau­fort for train­ing. Af­ter a fur­ther move to Hauteville for more train­ing and a foot­ball tour­na­ment and box­ing com­pe­ti­tion, both of which the 7th Le­ices­ters won, on 16th Septem­ber the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Savy sta­tion for Caestre. On 23rd Septem­ber the bat­tal­ion marched to Berthen. On 26th Septem­ber they moved by bus to Scot­tish Wood and then to Bed­ford House as re­serve in the for­ward area.

Af­ter two days rest at Mic­mac Camp the bat­tal­ion was back in the for­ward area on 29th. The third Bat­tle of Ypres had been rag­ing for two months and the ground was full of wa­ter-logged shell holes, which had to be ne­go­ti­ated over duck­boards.

The 7th Le­ices­ters joined the bat­tle on the night of the 30th Septem­ber, march­ing up to Poly­gon Wood, which had been cap­tured by the Aus­tralians.

The 9th Le­ices­ters took over po­si­tions in the right half of the Poly­gon sec­tor just out­side the wood with the 7th Bat­tal­ion be­hind them in sup­port and the 6th Le­ices­ters in re­serve. On 1st Oc­to­ber the en­emy be­gan a heavy bar­rage. The Le­ices­ters nev­er­the­less pushed for­ward.

An in­tense ar­tillery duel fol­lowed on 2nd Oc­to­ber be­fore the bat­tal­ion was re­lieved and marched south-east of Zille­beke Lake to Wilt­shire Farm.

On 4th Oc­to­ber the bat­tal­ion moved up again to south of Zille­beke Lake, bivouack­ing there. On the fol­low­ing day they were back in the sup­port line west of Poly­gon Wood.

On 6th Oc­to­ber two com­pa­nies moved up to the front line at Reu­tel, with the other two com­pa­nies in sup­port. On 10th Oc­to­ber, amid a hos­tile bar­rage, the bat­tal­ion was re­lieved and moved to An­zac Camp.

On the 11th Oc­to­ber they en­trained at Oud­er­dom sta­tion for Eb­blinghem and marched to bil­lets and camp at La Carnois. Af­ter four days rest they marched to Les Ciseaux and were taken by bus to dugouts in the rail­way em­bank­ments at Shrap­nel Cor­ner.

Af­ter re­main­ing here un­til 24th Oc­to­ber they moved to B Camp at Chateau Se­gard for re­or­gan­i­sa­tion and train­ing. Af­ter three days ca­ble lay­ing at Clapham Junction at the be­gin­ning of Novem­ber the bat­tal­ion re­turned to B Camp be­fore mov­ing to dugouts on the Zille­beke Bund on 7th Novem­ber and to the front line on the fol­low­ing day.

Af­ter re­turn­ing to A Camp at Chateau Se­gard on 13th Novem­ber the bat­tal­ion moved on to Devon­shire Camp in the Ren­inghelst area and on 17th be­gan a five day trans­fer by march to Coupigny.

On 25th Novem­ber they moved again to Fre­villers for train­ing. On 30th Novem­ber the bat­tal­ion re­ceived ur­gent or­ders to en­train at Savy for Tin­court. On 1st De­cem­ber 1917 the bat­tal­ion went into the front and sup­port lines near Tin­court, mov­ing into the sup­port trenches at Epehy on 4th.

Back in the front line from the 8th-11th De­cem­ber the bat­tal­ion in­stalled wiring, im­proved trenches and dug a new front line.

Af­ter a break at Viller­sFau­con they re­turned to the front line from 16th-20th.

On Christ­mas Eve the bat­tal­ion re­turned to the trenches for four days, but were given their Christ­mas din­ner at Saulcourt on 29th De­cem­ber.

The new year of 1918 be­gan with a four day trench tour, fol­lowed by train­ing at Liéra­mont and Haut Al­laines un­til 19th Jan­uary.

On the 20th the bat­tal­ion moved to Epehy by light rail­way and be­gan an­other trench tour be­fore mov­ing into Brigade Re­serve at Saulcourt on 28th.

On 4th Fe­bru­ary the bat­tal­ion moved into sup­port at Epehy. Re­lieved on 7th Fe­bru­ary the bat­tal­ion moved by light rail­way to Mois­lains, where train­ing took place un­til 18th Fe­bru­ary.

The bat­tal­ion then moved to B Camp, Tem­pleux la Fosse, and worked on the trenches and rail­way at Flam­in­court. From 24th -28th Fe­bru­ary the bat­tal­ion was based at Adrian Camp, Villers-Fau­con, for wiring work and trench dig­ging.

In March it be­came clear that the Ger­mans were plan­ning a Spring Of­fen­sive. On the morn­ing of the en­emy as­sault, 21st March 1918, the 7th Bat­tal­ion was hold­ing the left hand por­tion of the front be­tween Pez­ières and Epehy vil­lage when it was at­tacked by Ger­man stormtroop­ers.

The bat­tle for Epehy raged all day. On 22nd March the bat­tal­ion was or­dered to re­treat to­wards the old Somme bat­tle­field of 1916, cross­ing the Peronne Canal to Aize­court-le-Bas and Feuil­lau­court and tak­ing up po­si­tion on a ridge to the north of Hem.

On 2nd April the bat­tal­ion marched to Dra­noutre and en­trained at St. Roch sta­tion, Amiens, hav­ing been posted once more to the Ypres Salient. They pro­ceeded by lorry to Mon­mouthshire Camp, mov­ing on to But­ter­fly and Leeds Camps, La Clytte, Chipawa and Scot­tish Wood Camps and ar­riv­ing at Manawatu Camp on 11th.

On 12th April the bat­tal­ion went into the trenches, hold­ing the front, re­serve and sup­port lines un­til 17th April dur­ing the sec­ond ma­jor Ger­man of­fen­sive which had opened on the Lys. In spite of a heavy Ger­man at­tack the bat­tal­ion held out un­til re­lieved on 1st May. Hav­ing been with­drawn to Oost Houck they marched to Wiz­ernes on 4th May and en­trained for Labery where train­ing took place un­til 12th May.

On 14th May the bat­tal­ion marched via Prouilly to the trenches west of Her­monville in the val­ley of the River Aisne.

On 27th May the bat­tal­ion en­tered the 3rd Bat­tle of the Aisne, be­gun by the Ger­mans as part of their Spring Of­fen­sive.

Al­bert, aged 21, was re­ported miss­ing and pre­sumed killed in ac­tion on 27th May 1918.

His body was never found. By the time he died he had been pro­moted to Act­ing Sergeant.

Al­bert is com­mem­o­rated on the Sois­sons Me­mo­rial, Aisne, and on the Car­il­lon.

He was posthu­mously awarded the Mil­i­tary Medal.

Al­bert’s mother re­ceived a let­ter from a Cap­tain and Ad­ju­tant of the Reg­i­ment in­form­ing her that the Corps Com­man­der had been pleased to award the Mil­i­tary Medal to her son, Sergeant A. Coul­son, Le­ices­ter­shire Reg­i­ment, and ex­tend­ing the con­grat­u­la­tions of the Bri­gadier and Com­mand­ing Of­fi­cer.

Ernest James John Gan­ley.

Ernest James John Gan­ley was born in Bush­bury, Stafford­shire, on 5th July 1899.

He was the el­dest son of Alexan­der Gan­ley and his wife Marguerite (née Brock­bank) who were mar­ried in St. He­len’s, Lan­cashire, in 1895.

In 1901 Ernest’s fa­ther was an elec­tric coil win­der who later be­come a life in­sur­ance agent; his mother was a dress­maker. Ernest had two broth­ers Wil­fred and Arthur and seven sis­ters Alice, Elsie, Eileen, Winifred, No­rah, Dorothy and Hilda.

No­rah, how­ever, died aged 2, in 1913. In 1901 the fam­ily lived at 17 South Street, Bush­bury.

In 1904, how­ever, they moved to Lough­bor­ough, firstly liv­ing at 3 Broad Street, later at 101 Ren­dell Street and then at 70 Wood Gate. In Lough­bor­ough the fam­ily at­tended St. Mary’s Ro­man Catholic Church.

When Ernest left school he be­came ap­pren­tice spin­ner. In 1915 he was sum­moned to the Lough­bor­ough Petty Ses­sions Court for steal­ing a penny packet of cig­a­rettes from a slot ma­chine be­long­ing to Ernest A. White of Rat­cliffe Road.

He had used a coun­ter­feit brass disc in the ma­chine. As, how­ever, he ex­pressed re­gret to the Court for what he had done he was ac­quit­ted and only had to pay costs.

Ernest en­listed in Lough­bor­ough on 7th Oc­to­ber 1916. As­signed to Army Re­serve he was not mo­bilised un­til 26th July 1917 when he was sent to the 87th Train­ing Re­serve Bat­tal­ion.

Un­der one month later, on 22nd Au­gust he was posted to the 15th Train­ing Re­serve Bat­tal­ion and on 26th Septem­ber trans­ferred to the 246th In­fantry Bat­tal­ion at Thoresby Park, Not­ting­hamshire.

On 1st Novem­ber he was again trans­ferred, this time to the 51st (Grad­u­ated) Bat­tal­ion of the Sher­wood Foresters (Notts & Derby Reg­i­ment) at Don­caster.

Ernest was granted leave from 2nd-6th March 1918 and not long af­ter­wards, on 5th April 1918, he was sent to France as Pri­vate 107512 to join the 1st Bat­tal­ion of the Sher­wood Foresters.

He joined them at Hangest-en-San­terre where the bat­tal­ion was un­der­go­ing re­or­gan­i­sa­tion. On 12th April the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Hangest for St. Roche sta­tion, Amiens, and marched into Corps Re­serve at Quer­rieu. On 15th April they moved to Blangy and two days later to Blangy-Tronville.

On 19th April the bat­tal­ion went into the front line trenches at Villers-Bret­toneaux.

Re­lieved on 23rd April they marched to Blangy-Tronville but on the fol­low­ing day were or­dered to march to Blangy Wood and at­tack Villers-Bre­ton­neaux.

The bat­tal­ion met the en­emy in the Bois l’Abbé where a line was taken up. They held this line for three days and suc­ceeded in ex­tend­ing it by 630 yards to the right.

Re­lieved on the even­ing of 27th the bat­tal­ion marched to bivouac in Blangy Wood. On the fol­low­ing day they pro­ceeded to bil­lets in Ca­mon to clean up and rest.

On 2nd May, af­ter an overnight stay in bil­lets in Clairy-Saul­choix, the bat­tal­ion en­trained at Saleux sta­tion for Fismes and marched to huts south-west of Chéry-Char­treuse. Train­ing took place at Chéry on 7th and 8th May, fol­lowed by a three-day move via Mag­neux and Rucy to take up the sup­port po­si­tion at Ju­vin­court.

The bat­tal­ion then held the front line from 17th-24th May but af­ter be­ing re­lieved had only been in rest bil­lets at Ven­te­lay for two days when they were or­dered for­ward to Roucy and then to the Aisne line.

The Al­lies had just re­ceived in­for­ma­tion about an im­pend­ing Ger­man at­tack.

On 27th May, the first day of the 3rd Bat­tle of the Aisne, the bat­tal­ion suf­fered heavy ca­su­al­ties and Ernest, aged 18, was killed in ac­tion.

Ernest’s body was never found and he is com­mem­o­rated on the Sois­sons Me­mo­rial, Aisne.

He is also re­mem­bered on the me­mo­rial in St. Mary’s Church, Lough­bor­ough, and on the Car­il­lon.

Ernest Lind­sey’s fam­ily lived in John Street, Lough­bor­ough firstly at No.19 and then at 21. The houses in the street were later de­mol­ished. This photo dates back to the late 1950s.

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