DREAM THEATER

Metal Hammer (UK) - - Live - HAM­MER­SMITH APOLLO, LON­DON THEA DE GALLIER

Dream Theater don’t need an overblown pro­duc­tion. The com­plex­ity of their sound more than makes up for the ab­sence of pyro or a full-on light show, and as they be­gin the first half of their set – a com­bi­na­tion of post-mil­len­nium tracks like The Dark Eter­nal Night, The Big­ger Pic­ture and The Gift Of Mu­sic – the com­pet­ing mo­tifs from John Petrucci’s vir­tu­oso riffs and Jor­dan Rudess’s key­board noodling hold the au­di­ence en­rap­tured. James LaBrie’s voice strug­gles at times to reach the high­est notes, but the ef­fort­less­ness with which the band switch time sig­na­tures and keys means the fo­cus is on how re­mark­ably well they work to­gether, rather than where any in­di­vid­u­als fall down. In Act Two they power through Im­ages And Words’ jour­ney of emo­tion, from Pull Me Un­der’s ag­gres­sion to Wait For Sleep’s melan­choly ru­mi­na­tions. James’s voice soars to tri­umphantly hit the notes that had eluded him pre­vi­ously, and de­spite the in­stru­men­tal in­ter­ludes that nearly ev­ery song de­scends into, Dream Theater are im­pres­sive and ac­ces­si­ble to watch by virtue of the stir­ring melodies they pack into ev­ery song. An en­core of A Change Of Sea­sons in full en­sures this is no or­di­nary rock show, but a three-act opus that rides the highs of their most mem­o­rable ma­te­rial.

James LaBrie knows the high­est notes are within his grasp

Dream

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.