CRA­DLE OF FILTH

Dani Filth lifts the lid on Cra­dle’s goth metal an­them

Metal Hammer (UK) - - Contents - WORDS: STEPHEN HILL • IL­LUS­TRA­TION: MARK LEARY

Why Sus­sex’s favourite ex­treme met­allers wrote Nym­phetamine.

WE NEEDED A SONG TO BUILD MORE MO­MEN­TUM

“We had been on Sony for the last cou­ple of years, and that had led to a place where we’d started get­ting a lit­tle more com­mer­cial suc­cess. Baby­lon AD from the al­bum Damna­tion In A Day had ac­tu­ally had some chart suc­cess; I re­mem­ber hear­ing it on the ra­dio in my car one day, which was very strange, and we’d head­lined a big stage at Oz­zfest, so when we signed to Road­run­ner they were look­ing to am­plify that.”

IT ORIG­I­NALLY SOUNDED DIF­FER­ENT

“The la­bel were keen to take the song and take that mid­dle sec­tion from it to make it a sin­gle, which we were quite happy with. Ob­vi­ously there is two parts to it, Nym­phetamine (Over­dose) and Nym­phetamine (Fix), and their idea was to chop it in two. Orig­i­nally it’s very dif­fer­ent; the gui­tars were com­pletely dif­fer­ent and it was faster, the lyrics were faster. But we had some time off from the stu­dio over Easter and came back and messed about with it and the re­sults were one of those rare times where you go, ‘Fuck me! This is good, I think we’ve got some­thing here!’”

THE VIDEO WAS CRU­CIAL

“The la­bel were keen for us to work with Dani Ja­cobs, who had done a lot of top pop acts of the day. We sat down and dis­cussed ideas and he wanted it to al­lude to Mac­beth, with a woman play­ing the male part. There was a bit of les­bian­ism in there as well, and so we had

Liv [Kris­tine, vo­cals] on this swing and me with the big coat and the ‘Nym­phetamic’. There was a lot of pre-pro­duc­tion on it; we filmed it be­neath the Lon­don Dun­geon and it gave it this dank, dark feel­ing.”

WE WEREN’T SCARED OF CRIT­ICS

“The metal elit­ists had al­ready come for us by the time Nym­phetamine [the al­bum] dropped so we weren’t that both­ered by hav­ing a melodic song, to be hon­est. We had no real reser­va­tions about hav­ing it as a sin­gle, es­pe­cially as we saw it as part of a big­ger pic­ture. It was just one part of the al­bum. You have to get all the way through the en­tire record be­fore you reach Nym­phetamine (Fix), and we just saw it as an es­sen­tial part of the nar­ra­tive.”

IT GOT US SOME FA­MOUS FANS

“That song is how Bam Margera dis­cov­ered us! He heard that al­bum and fell in love with it, and then flew us out to Amer­ica to be on his TV show. We would hang around with him quite a lot at that time. I mean, it was our big­gest-sell­ing al­bum by far. It al­ways makes me laugh that this is our big­gest song and it helped the al­bum do so well, be­cause once fans put the record on they were con­fronted by the first song be­ing Gilded Cunt! That al­ways makes me chuckle.”

IT BUILT OUR AU­DI­ENCE

“I don’t think we at­tracted a dif­fer­ent kind of au­di­ence, but it did give us more of the same au­di­ence. We had al­ready had a tour with Type O Neg­a­tive and Moon­spell be­fore that al­bum; we had started writ­ing on that tour, in fact, so we had al­ready dipped our toes into more gothic wa­ters. We did go fur­ther down that road on Nym­phetamine and the shows did get big­ger, but it wasn’t like we were at­tract­ing teeny bop­pers or disco di­vas!”

CRYPTORIAN­A – THE SEDUCTIVEN­ESS OF DE­CAY IS OUT NOW VIA NU­CLEAR BLAST

“WE WERE HANG­ING OUT WITH BAM MARGERA”

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