Rot­ting Christ

Metal Hammer (UK) - - Reviews | Albums. Lives. Merch. -

THEIR GREAT­EST SPELLS

SEA­SON OF MIST

UN­EARTHLY RET­RO­SPEC­TIVE FROM THE GREEK TI­TANS NESTLED AWAY AMONGST

the in­spir­ing his­tory and cul­ture of Greece, and away from the chaos of cre­ativ­ity of the Scan­di­na­vian scene, Rot­ting Christ man­aged to forge their own ex­cit­ing take on the early 90s black metal sound be­fore go­ing on to ven­ture into all man­ner of im­pres­sive new ter­ri­tory, in­cor­po­rat­ing gothic el­e­ments and the heroic at­ti­tude of Manowar as much as any nods to Bathory and Celtic Frost. Fi­nally en­joy­ing the fruits of their 30-year en­deav­our, this com­pi­la­tion is a per­fect open­ing chap­ter to a mu­si­cal story that’s as rich and event­ful as the an­cient mytholo­gies the band find so in­spir­ing. From the raw cer­e­mony of one of their first sin­gles, Feast Of The Grand Whore, to the ar­cane om­nipo­tence of new song

I Will Not Serve, Their Great­est Spells is a vivid ac­count of how the band, led by pow­er­house brother Sakis and Themis To­lis (what it is about gui­tarist/drum­mer sib­ling com­bos?) have re­fused to rest on their lau­rels or be bound by con­straints over 12 al­bums, with quan­tum leaps even tak­ing place be­tween the vociferous call to arms of 2010’s Aealo and the omi­nous con­jur­ing of 2016’s stun­ning Rit­u­als. Even the se­quenc­ing alone is enough to dis­play the band’s ver­sa­til­ity, with Sor­row­ful Farewell’s Megadeth-meets-melan­cholic grandeur sit­ting next to the chill­ing evo­ca­tion of In Yu­men-Xibalba, and the ex­u­ber­ant thrash of Fg­menth, Thy Gift from their de­but, Thy

Mighty Contract, giv­ing way to Ze Nig­mar in all its mono­lithic glory. The vis­ceral yet el­e­gant ma­te­rial from that de­but still packs as much power as the stri­dent me­tal­lic blus­ter of Athana­toi Este, and while As­tral Em­bod­i­ment and Wel­come To Hel, bonus tracks from Ge­n­e­sis and Katá Ton Daí­mona Eau­toú (to give the track its translit­er­ated ti­tle) re­spec­tively, are some­what dis­pens­able in such es­teemed com­pany, with 31 other tracks that tra­verse the best peaks and val­leys in ex­treme metal’s past and present, there’s very few qualms to be had.

FOR FANS OF: PRI­MOR­DIAL, CELTIC FROST, MOONSPELL

ADAM REES

Rot­ting Christ cast an evileye over their cat­a­logue

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