ICE DYE TEE

Mollie Makes - - Introducin­g Trends -

YOU WILL NEED

QQQQQQWhit­e cot­ton shirt Pow­dered fab­ric dye Ice Plas­tic bucket or dish tub Cook­ing rack Rubber gloves

Pre-wash your gar­ment ac­cord­ing to your dye’s in­struc­tions. We chose to skip dip­ping our T-shirt in soda ash be­fore ap­ply­ing the dye as we wanted the fin­ished piece to look slightly washed out.

Scrunch up your gar­ment ran­domly and place it on a rack on top of the bucket or tub. If you want, you can tie it up to cre­ate a tie dye ef­fect. Cover your gar­ment with ice. We used crushed ice in or­der to achieve the chalk ef­fect.

Start sprin­kling the fab­ric dye on top of the ice. Use pas­tel coloured dye for the chalk-in­spired look. The ice melt­ing process will de­cide on the fi­nal pat­tern. All the parts that aren’t cov­ered with ice or dye will stay white, and the colours on the ice will be darker and more vi­brant. Let the ice melt. Put your rubber gloves on and re­move the gar­ment from the rack. Place it in the sink and rinse as much of the dye out of the gar­ment as you can.

Place your gar­ment in the wash­ing ma­chine on a gen­tle cy­cle and leave it to dry. Lana Red never leaves her house with­out her red lip­stick and al­ways wears dresses or skirts. And al­though she loves to!bake she’s the worst chef in the world, leav­ing her boyfriend to do the cook­ing – un­less it’s a!bowl of co­copu"s. www.lanared­stu­dio.com

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