Norfolk

Making a mark for Norwich

James reveals that as well as the big shop move, Juels has applied for its own hallmark for the jewellery it creates

- This column is sponsored by Juels’ Limited, Royal Arcade, Norwich. juelslimit­ed.co.uk juelsltd@gmail.com 01603 666373

Firstly a quick update for the new premises at 32 London Street, Norwich; many have inquired about the progress of the new store and the hive of activity around the scaffoldin­g. We are hurtling towards completing the first fix and preparing of services throughout the site.

It has been a complex administra­tive operation to get all trades on site at various times so that social distancing can continue during this Covid-19 pandemic. This month should see the transforma­tion happening in earnest once plasterers, plumbers and decorators can finally get more hands-on.

In the world of jewellery we have applied for our own hallmark with the Birmingham Assay office. This process will allow our future jewellery creations and bespoke service to thrive with our own hallmark for precious metals.

We will be governed by the anchor symbol from the country’s leading assay office in Birmingham. The Hallmarkin­g Act 1973 makes it an offence to described as platinum, gold or silver items which are not hallmarked as appropriat­e or exempt from hallmarkin­g.

To assay is to test the purity of the precious metal and therefore legally sell in various carat measures to protect the consumer. For example nine-carat gold is made of 375 particles per 1,000 of fine gold and the assay mark or poincon is then stamped into the item to prove it has been tested by a regulator.

We have initially chosen our three designs from the pattern provided that incorporat­es our initials of J and L representi­ng Juels’ Limited and await the assay office’s final design allocation. This will then be impressed into all of our jewellery creations.

The Norwich hallmark historical­ly comprised of the lion surmounted by the castle, or the castle above the lion, the same as the heraldic coat of arms for the city. Although the hallmarkin­g of goods originated in Britain during the 1300s, our regional Norwich assay officially came into effect in 1565 and lasted until its closure in 1702 (more’s the pity). Throughout this period the region’s most prolific manufactur­er was the Haselwood family (Arthur, his son Arthur and relation Elizabeth) operating from the 17th into the early 18th century. Today only four of our assay offices are still in existence; Birmingham (anchor mark) being the most prolific while London (leopard’s head), Edinburgh (castle) and Sheffield (Tudor rose) are the others.

Juels’ Limited are always seeking to purchase quality items, as well as being premier gold buyers. For further informatio­n contact James in the shop.

 ??  ?? ABOVE: Hallmarks give essential informatio­n. This christenin­g mug’s marks are: (from the left) Martin, Hall & Co of London and Sheffield; the Lion indicates .925 Sterling silver; the leopard’s head is for London; the letter ‘r’ indicates the years 1872/3; The monarch’s head is Queen Victoria
ABOVE: Hallmarks give essential informatio­n. This christenin­g mug’s marks are: (from the left) Martin, Hall & Co of London and Sheffield; the Lion indicates .925 Sterling silver; the leopard’s head is for London; the letter ‘r’ indicates the years 1872/3; The monarch’s head is Queen Victoria

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