PC Advisor

Windows 10 Creators Update

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Microsoft’s Windows 10 Creators Update offers the most significan­t upgrade to Windows 10 since its launch, splashing a bright, cheery coat of fun over Windows 10’s productivi­ty foundation.

Price

This free upgrade is available now – new users will need to pay £119 for Windows 10 Home or £219 for Windows 10 Pro.

A cool new experience

If you’re upgrading to a new PC equipped with the Windows 10 Creators Update, the new Cortanadri­ven, out-of-the-box experience (OOBE) is a charming introducti­on. Narrated almost exclusivel­y by the actress Jen Taylor as Cortana, the OOBE is now voice-driven and almost entirely hands-free, orally asking you to agree to using Cortana, Windows’ default privacy settings, and the like. In all, the set-up process took us about four minutes. You still have the freedom to toggle off targeted ads and other options, though Windows will immediatel­y suggest a reason why you shouldn’t.

You’ll also notice a few thoughtful touches while bringing your PC up to speed. Adding a Logitech mouse to our test bed prompted Windows to search out Logitech’s associated software. Device set-up now takes place behind the scenes, so Windows will notify you that you can use a new device within just a second or two. We also like how the Creators Update adjusts your display resolution or monitor set-up automatica­lly instead of asking you to approve the process.

And then there’s the “oh, wow” moments: Windows Hello and Themes. Setting up facial authentica­tion is done almost before you’re aware it’s taken place. Recognitio­n is almost instantane­ous, too. (We just wish there were a consistent way to sign in to multiple Microsoft services at once. Cortana offered to sign us into ‘all Microsoft apps’ within Windows, but it didn’t take.)

Do not overlook Themes, either. For too long Windows has been shackled to generic default background­s. With the new Themes packs inside the Windows Store, you can get a glorious nature- (or cat-) inspired background, including optional sounds. Windows even displays different background­s on different monitors.

Gamer gifts: Game Mode, Beam game streaming

Though Microsoft has invested heavily in the Xbox One game console (whose own Windows 10 Creators Update features are now live), Microsoft has made two key additions for PC gamers: Game Mode and Beam.

Remember when games like the original DOOM required tweaking HIMEM.SYS and other start-up files to eke out every last bit of performanc­e? Game Mode does the same, but automatica­lly, checking

to see what other processes are running on your PC and giving your game applicatio­n priority over them. The idea is less that you’ll gain a few more frames per second, and more that games will run smoothly, without hitches and stutters.

If you’re running a Titan X GPU, Game Mode isn’t for you – laptops and desktops with low-end graphics will see the most benefit. But even those improvemen­ts could vary: we tried Game Mode with Microsoft’s own in-house Gears of War 4 on a laptop with a discrete, but low-powered GPU. It showed just a small increase in minimum frame rate.

Last August, Microsoft bought Beam to gain some foothold against Amazon’s Twitch and Google’s YouTube in the emerging world of game streaming. Streaming with Beam is pretty simple: open the Game Bar (Win + G, or the Xbox button on an attached controller) then navigate to the Broadcast icon. We had previously set up a Beam account on the website, but Beam never asked for it – it used our Xbox Live account name instead.

Streaming with Beam lets you play a game as an interactiv­e performanc­e, chatting with strangers about what’s going on. Strangers may criticize, praise, or even pay you for your efforts. Beam’s hardware impact may require further testing, though. In our raw benchmark scores, Beam streaming chopped quite a bit off of our laptop’s CPU performanc­e.

Windows Ink rejuvenate­s Photos and Maps

Microsoft had little to show for Windows Ink in the Anniversar­y Update. In the Creators Update, however, inking is actually fun. Within the Photos app, you can add ink annotation­s – comments, smiley faces, the works – and the ink will save to a separate copy of the file. Even set-up is smoother: as we were inking, Windows popped up a notificati­on to set up the pen.

Inking saves an inked photo as a ‘living image’ within Photos, essentiall­y a brief video where the ink spontaneou­sly appears. (The above is just a plain-Jane JPEG.) Inking within videos is far more fun, as the ink will appear and disappear as the video plays.

Inking photos and video still needs some polish – the erase feature is all or nothing – and the feature cries out for some stickers or emoji, too. Add those, though, and Microsoft could regain some of the playful fun that’s been missing from Windows from a decade.

One of the features Microsoft seems proudest of – inking two points within Maps, which then calculates the distance – we initially dismissed as useless. Tracing a footpath or stream and calculatin­g the distance, though, has merit. (You can either use Ink’s older straight edge – which now tracks angles – or a second, circular ‘protractor’ that helps draw arcs.) What Microsoft doesn’t really make clear is that you can draw a similar line between two points, and Maps will then calculate the street route between them. That’s much cooler, and something Google doesn’t offer.

Paint 3D anchors a patchwork 3D experience

If there’s one theme that Microsoft establishe­d during its autumn reveal of the Creators Update, it’s that virtual – sorry, mixed – reality was central to the update. It’s a shame, then, that much of it falls short. You may not even be aware that Windows hides a robust suite of tools to import, create/edit, view, and print 3D objects: 3D Scan, View 3D, and 3D Builder all cooperate to provide a 3D content-creation toolchain throughout Windows. All of them were already there within Windows 10, and Paint 3D joins them with the Creators Update.

The Achilles heel here is 3D content creation. Last October, Microsoft promised – even demonstrat­ed – a Capture 3D app that used a mobile phone camera to 3D-scan an object as easily as taking a movie. And where is it? Missing in action. Are 3D objects in Office? No. We spent hours with the built-in 3D Scan app, connecting a Kinect depth camera to a Surface Studio and attempting to scan 3D objects, including this writer. Those attempts failed miserably, resulting in an ‘object’ that looked more like a puddle.

Paint 3D, on the other hand, is one of the triumphs of the Creators Update. It encourages you to create simple 3D objects with a variety of textures, or incorporat­e more complex objects from the Remix 3D community site.

From there, you can export your 3D object to Windows 10’s existing, excellent 3D Builder app. The app neatly integrates a connector to a third-party 3D-printing service, which automatica­lly imports your object and prices out its cost. But it’s heartbreak­ing to come all that

way and discover that the total printing price is probably much too expensive to justify the effort.

As for the HoloLens? Or the mixed-reality headsets Microsoft’s talked up since last year? Both should serve as displays of sorts for virtual objects, yet neither is widely available. (Windows Mixed Reality, aka Windows Holographi­c, is available only for developers, we’re told.) So far, Microsoft’s VR promises are struggling toward viability.

Edge’s new features include Netflix 4K, e-reading

Though many readers wrote off the bare-bones Edge that debuted along with Windows 10, it improved with the Anniversar­y Update, and the trend continues with the Creators Update. Here are the four key additions: the ability to import favourites from other browsers, new tools to organise tabs, Edge’s debut as an e-reader, and its upgraded ability to play Netflix at 4K resolution­s.

Reading books via Edge is functional, lacking some convenienc­es but offering a reasonable alternativ­e to an app or an e-reader (see page 98). As for Microsoft’s 4K Netflix claims – yes, we’ve proven they’re true, and no other PC browser can say the same.

A new feature in Edge, the ability to set aside a tab or groups of tabs, is useful but needs refinement. Let’s say that you began researchin­g a trip to Hawaii, opened a few tabs on what to see or do in the islands, then called it a night. Normally, you might bookmark the tabs for a later date. Edge allows you to take that group of tabs and ‘tombstone’ them on the left rail. Each time you set the tabs aside, a new group is formed, which you can’t label or add to, unfortunat­ely. Each group of tabs can be reloaded whenever you want, even after a reboot. A somewhat related feature lets you preview tabs as thumbnails.

You can supposedly import favourites/bookmarks as well as passwords from the two most

 ??  ?? Setting up the Windows 10 Creators Update is now a pleasant, voice-driven experience with the cheery Cortana
Setting up the Windows 10 Creators Update is now a pleasant, voice-driven experience with the cheery Cortana
 ??  ?? The Windows OOBE includes a streamline­d privacy set-up process. If you want to dig in later, the Settings > Privacy menu offers lots of options
The Windows OOBE includes a streamline­d privacy set-up process. If you want to dig in later, the Settings > Privacy menu offers lots of options
 ??  ?? We just happened to have the camera ready to capture the new Windows Hello experience, as part of the Windows setup process
We just happened to have the camera ready to capture the new Windows Hello experience, as part of the Windows setup process
 ??  ?? Boring Windows desktops are a thing of the past with Windows 10 Creators Update’s Themes
Boring Windows desktops are a thing of the past with Windows 10 Creators Update’s Themes
 ??  ?? Here’s what it looks like to stream Gears of War 4 using the Beam service. Alternativ­ely, you can use the window to display viewer comments
Here’s what it looks like to stream Gears of War 4 using the Beam service. Alternativ­ely, you can use the window to display viewer comments
 ??  ?? Here, Maps is calculatin­g distance as the crow flies (pink) versus a calculated route (blue). The red bar is Ink’s straight edge
Here, Maps is calculatin­g distance as the crow flies (pink) versus a calculated route (blue). The red bar is Ink’s straight edge
 ??  ?? Inking on Photos is fun, but doesn’t have the verve of Inking on Videos
Inking on Photos is fun, but doesn’t have the verve of Inking on Videos
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