YES FEA­TUR­ING AN­DER­SON RABIN WAKE­MAN

VENUE WHISKY A GO GO, LOS AN­GE­LES DATE 26/08/2018

Prog - - Take a bow - TREVOR WOODS

Who would have thought all these years later that we’d be see­ing Quin­tes­sen­tial Yes: The 50th An­niver­sary Tour fea­tur­ing le­gends Jon An­der­son, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wake­man? But that’s ex­actly what tran­spires on a beau­ti­ful sum­mer night on the Sun­set

Strip in West Hol­ly­wood at the small yet leg­endary Whisky A Go Go club.

Tick­ets to tonight’s show are only $2, the same price they were when Yes first came to Amer­ica back in 1971. Fans lined up along a side­walk that stretched up a huge hill, hop­ing to score a ticket on the day of the con­cert. Thou­sands waited in line for hours, but only hun­dreds were able to get in the door. It was a spec­ta­cle. The mad­ness didn’t end there, though, as a crazy show would soon un­fold.

The first of the ARW trio to ap­pear on­stage are gui­tarist Trevor Rabin and key­board mae­stro Rick Wake­man, and the set starts with the Rabin-led in­stru­men­tal Cin­ema

– and it’s one hell of a start. When the two-minute jam ends, singer Jon An­der­son makes his way to the stage and they play an­other of­fer­ing from the 80s, Hold On. The har­monies of An­der­son, Rabin and bas­sist

Lee Pomeroy are a de­light.

For those who have doubts if 73-year-old An­der­son still has ‘it’, he does. He sounds su­perb and his vo­cal range is in­tact. What makes the man such a spe­cial tal­ent isn’t his vo­cal abil­ity alone, though – it’s the con­nec­tion he shows to the words he sings. He’s a show­man, and the en­ergy dis­played comes deep from within his heart and soul.

The set fea­tures a great mix­ture of both the 70s and 80s eras of Yes, enough to leave fans sat­is­fied no mat­ter which they pre­fer. I’ve Seen All

Good Peo­ple, And You And I, Per­pet­ual Change, Round­about and Owner Of A Lonely Heart are all crowd-pleasers. Heart Of The Sun­rise, the long­est jam from the al­bum Frag­ile, is a high­light. The in­ter­play be­tween Rabin and Wake­man is in­cred­i­ble: the in­tri­cacy of Rabin’s riffs and Wake­man’s syn­the­siser sends the crowd into a hard rock frenzy. Wake­man, garbed in his sparkling red wiz­ard-like robe, is still as fluid as ever on the keys. Dur­ing Rhythm Of Love he puts his own stamp on the song by adding a two-minute key­board solo, soar­ing up and down the Min­i­moog.

Rabin left Yes 35 years ago to have a suc­cess­ful ca­reer scor­ing Hol­ly­wood block­buster films, but his re­turn to the tour­ing stage is smooth and rock­ing – he plays with a great bal­ance of el­e­gance and in­ten­sity. The man is now in his early 60s, but he still looks at ease with a gui­tar in his hand. While each mem­ber of the band is won­der­ful to watch, this is Rabin’s show. Count­less so­los are per­formed and ex­e­cuted at a high level, with a wide va­ri­ety of dif­fer­ent gui­tar tones used. His name de­serves to be men­tioned when­ever there are dis­cus­sions about the best gui­tarists of all time.

All in all, this is a spe­cial show with an in­sanely ta­lented and fa­mous line-up. If you see these men, you won’t be dis­ap­pointed – you’ll leave the venue with a sense of awe and amaze­ment, want­ing to go and see them again.

Jon An­der­son, Trevor

Rabin and Rick Wake­man are quin­tes­sen­tial Yes, quin­tes­sen­tial prog. Here’s hop­ing their lega­cies con­tinue to un­fold for a while longer.

“THIS IS A SPE­CIAL SHOW WITH AN IN­SANELY TA­LENTED AND FA­MOUS LINE-UP.”

ALL SMILES: THE YES MEN CEL­E­BRATE THEIR AN­NIVER­SARY IN STYLE.

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