GOBLIN

VENUE THE UNION CHAPEL, LON­DON DATE 17/08/2018

Prog - - Take a bow - IS­ERE LLOYD-DAVIS

It’s been 40 years since film di­rec­tor Dario Ar­gento ap­pointed fel­low Ital­ian hor­ror mae­stro Clau­dio Si­mon­etti and his band Goblin to score the cult film Sus­piria.

To cel­e­brate the highly ven­er­ated clas­sic movie’s an­niver­sary, Si­mon­etti and his black-clad mu­si­cians are per­form­ing the in­fa­mous film mu­sic score live, in front of a seated au­di­ence in a church.

The Union Chapel’s per­fectly pre­served gothic re­vival ar­chi­tec­ture is an ideal set­ting for Goblin’s ghoul­ish tunes. At­mo­spher­i­cally lit up with dark red spot­lights and the flicker of can­dle­light, the ren­o­vated, award-win­ning venue has be­come a trendy holy haven for al­ter­na­tive mu­sic en­thu­si­asts.

As the bustling crowd of goths, prog­gers and hor­ror buffs squeeze into the last re­main­ing seats on the pews in a full house of God, you al­most for­get the lo­ca­tion’s pri­mary Angli­can func­tion. How­ever, we’re quickly re­minded that there’s no bar – this is strictly a tea-and­bis­cuits kind of place.

Af­ter a false start due to a mi­nor tech­ni­cal is­sue with the pro­jec­tor, much to Si­mon­etti’s amuse­ment, the quin­tet launch into the chill­ing notes of Sus­piria’s iconic theme tune, with the film pro­jected on the gi­gan­tic screen above the band be­gins.

In true Ital­ian cin­e­mato­graphic style, the first few min­utes of the fea­ture set the theme and we’re pro­pelled into Ar­gento’s 1977’s hor­ror in vivid colour, with dra­matic zoom­ing and panning shots.

The repetitive creep­ing of bells and ce­lesta acts as a fore­warn­ing for scenes of shock and gore.

Ar­gento’s use of light­ing is vis­ual po­etry through­out, en­hanced by the mu­sic’s in­ter­chang­ing men­ac­ing and en­chant­ing melodies. It’s spell­bind­ing.

Prior to the show, Si­mon­etti had warned the crowd that his voice was a lit­tle raspy as he was suf­fer­ing from a cold, yet it ac­tu­ally en­hances the ter­ri­fy­ing mur­murs and shrieks in his gloomy vo­cals.

As the mu­si­cians dis­creetly nav­i­gate the stage in dark­ness, cre­at­ing a ca­coph­ony of tweaking man­dolin, pound­ing drums and taunt­ing bass, Goblin’s tim­ing along­side the film im­ages is tight, each macabre note hit with ac­cu­racy and skill.

While the Union Chapel roars with laugh­ter at some of the medi­ocre act­ing and out­dated di­a­logue in Sus­piria, the most fa­mous scenes – such as the stained glass hang­ing, the dog at­tack and the room of barbed wire – are brought to life by the live band’s per­for­mance, no­tice­ably evok­ing feel­ings of ner­vous­ness among the crowd.

Re­leased four years af­ter Mike Old­field’s Tubu­lar Bells ap­peared in the iconic and hair-rais­ing sound­track to The Ex­or­cist, Goblin’s Sus­piria al­bum re­mains a pil­lar of the prog and oc­cult rock gen­res, as well as a highly re­spected film score among hor­ror en­thu­si­asts.

“GOBLIN’S

TIM­ING ALONG­SIDE THE FILM IM­AGES IS TIGHT, EACH

MACABRE NOTE HIT WITH AC­CU­RACY AND SKILL.”

RED LIGHTS, SIL­VER SCREEN: GOBLIN SOUND­TRACK DARIO AR­GENTO’S CLAS­SIC IN STYLE.

SOUND AND VI­SION: THE BAND AND BIG SCREEN INTHE UNION CHAPEL.

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