WOMEN WHO DE­FIED THE ODDS

Project Calm - - Contents -

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TEM­PLE GRANDIN Tem­ple Grandin is the grande dame of autism. Born in 1947, she was di­ag­nosed in her 40s, but rather than fol­low­ing the med­i­cal ad­vice of the time to in­sti­tu­tion­alise her daugh­ter, Tem­ple’s mother, Eusta­cia, took a dif­fer­ent ap­proach. She ex­plored pro­gres­sive ther­a­pies and pri­vate schools to adapt to Tem­ple’s needs, as well as sup­port­ing Tem­ple’s in­ter­est in agri­cul­ture. Af­ter notic­ing how the dairy cows on her aunt’s farm were calmed when held in a squeeze chute dur­ing in­oc­u­la­tion, at the age of 18 Tem­ple in­vented a ‘squeeze ma­chine’, into which she put her­self to calm down. Faced with crit­i­cism over this ma­chine at col­lege, Tem­ple con­ducted sci­en­tific ex­per­i­ments to eval­u­ate its ef­fi­cacy, widely cited as ev­i­dence of her re­source­ful­ness. Af­ter grad­u­a­tion in 1966, she earned de­grees in hu­man psy­chol­ogy and masters and doc­toral de­grees in an­i­mal sci­ence, which led her to re­design the way live­stock are man­aged on farms and slaugh­ter­houses. Her more hu­mane meth­ods are now widely used in the in­dus­try. A fa­mous spokesper­son on autism, her work and pub­lic per­sona helped break down years of stigma as one of the first adults to pub­licly dis­close that she was autis­tic.

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MIL­LI­CENT FAWCETT The peace­ful ac­tivist Mil­li­cent Fawcett was born in 1847 in Alde­burgh, Suf­folk in a home which en­cour­aged dis­cus­sion. She was elected pres­i­dent of the Na­tional Union of Women’s Suf­frage in 1907-1919, which cam­paigned for the women’s vote, and was in­stru­men­tal in se­cur­ing vot­ing rights for women over 30 in 1918. Mil­li­cent died in 1929, a year af­ter women were given univer­sal suf­frage. The Fawcett So­ci­ety (named af­ter her), cam­paigns for gen­der equal­ity to­day.

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