JOHNNY MARR

From night­mar­ish torch songs to melan­cholic dance­floor pop, roar­ing post-punk and be­yond...

Q (UK) - - Maverick -

1 HAND IN GLOVE The Smiths (THE SMITHS, 1984) The de­but sin­gle that made The Smiths in­stant cult he­roes achieved a kind of vig­or­ous des­o­la­tion with Mor­ris­sey and Marr in per­fect bal­ance. 2 HOW SOON IS NOW? The Smiths (HATFUL OF HOL­LOW, 1984) This prod­uct of one in­spired night’s work was an eerie wall of sound in­spired by Cree­dence, Can and disco. 3 LAST NIGHT I DREAMT THAT SOME­BODY LOVED ME The Smiths (STRANGEWAYS, HERE WE COME, 1987) Marr’s favourite Smiths song is a night­mar­ish, end-of-the-world torch song. 4 (NOTH­ING BUT) FLOW­ERS Talk­ing Heads (NAKED, 1988) Talk­ing Heads’ last great song was one of Marr’s first post-Smiths gigs. In­spired by Afrobeat, he makes his 12- string glit­ter and dance.

5 GET­TING AWAY WITH IT

elec­tronic (Sin­gle, 1989) Pop per­fec­tion at the first time of ask­ing, this three-way ’ 80s pop sum­mit is exquisitely up­hol­stered dance­floor melan­choly.

6 GET THE MES­SAGE

elec­tronic (elec­tronic, 1991) A gam­bolling joy from Elec­tronic’s first LP, this is one of Marr’s proud­est achieve­ments . An un­beat­able Marr/ Sum­ner mind­meld.

7 DASH­BOARD

Mod­est Mouse (We Were Dead Be­fore the Ship even Sank, 2007) Marr’s very first ses­sion with Mod­est Mouse yielded one of their most suc­cess­ful sin­gles, a twitchy yelp-pop smash à la Talk­ing Heads.

8 CHEAT ON ME

the Cribs (ig­nore the ig­no­rant, 2009) Johnny Marr’s spi­ralling, lyri­cal riffs on his first sin­gle with The Cribs in­stantly gave the band new di­men­sions of drama and com­plex­ity.

9 NEW TOWN VELOCITY

Johnny Marr (the Mes­sen­ger, 2013) Mem­o­ries of an im­pa­tient youth couched in a sel­f­ref­er­enc­ing fu­sion of The Smiths’ po­etry and Elec­tronic’s lush­ness.

10 PLAYLAND

Johnny Marr (Playland, 2014) From his sec­ond solo al­bum, Marr’s for­ma­tive post-punk in­flu­ence comes roar­ing back into life on this mil­i­tant ode to adrenalin, ablaze with ten­sion and ur­gency.

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