JESS GLYNNE

AL­WAYS A IN BE­TWEEN AT­LANTIC, A OUT 12 OC­TO­BER

Q (UK) - - Review -

Hit-ma­chine re­turns, chart-top­ping for­mula in­tact.

Con­sid­er­ing Jess Glynne ranks among our big­gest stars (she re­cently be­came the first British fe­male solo artist to score seven UK Num­ber 1s), the Lon­doner cuts a sur­pris­ingly un­re­mark­able fig­ure in the pop fir­ma­ment. But her up­beat, Every­woman shtick con­tin­ues to pay div­i­dends on her sec­ond of­fer­ing – a col­lec­tion of lightly soul­ful dance-pop that show­cases her strong, un­showy voice and ap­par­ently bound­less op­ti­mism. The lat­ter may well be re­spon­si­ble for her strato­spheric suc­cess – a Glynne hit emits a sense of cel­e­bra­tion in the tra­di­tion of the most joy­ful chart-top­pers. Ad­mit­tedly, hers is a mode that doesn’t stray far from the pop sta­tus quo, but Glynne should still be ap­plauded for mas­ter­ing such a feel­good for­mula. ★★★ RACHEL AROESTI Lis­ten To: I’ll Be There | 123 | Rollin

“A sense of cel­e­bra­tion”: Jess Glynne stays pos­i­tive.

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