Real Classic

BSA STARFIRE PROJECT

When a friend was in need ofa suitably sprightly Britbike, Odgie sprang into action to build an affordable 250 Beesa. He's sourced and sorted most of the big bits, so it's time to start putting them together...

- Photos by Odgie Himself

When a friend was in need of a suitably sprightly Britbike, Odgie sprang into action to build an affordable 250 Beesa. He's sourced and sorted most of the big bits, so it's time to start putting them together...

Having located and fettled the main parts required, the building could start in earnest. I've covered lots of the basics like wheelbuild­ing in previous builds, so rather than do a blow by blow account of everything, I'll just pick up on certain aspects and cover them in more detail. Lots of these things are really subtle; if they weren't pointed out you'd never know about them, and even when the build is finished they're not always obvious. And that's kind of the art or craft of the bike builder; it's to change things sometimes ever so slightly, or design systems that are functional but unobtrusiv­e, and then make all the disparate parts flow into a cohesive whole. The whole idea is when you look at the finished bike, it just looks 'right'. You don't necessaril­y need to know how certain angles were changed or how systems were simplified, but your eye subconscio­usly catches the way everything fits together, and it tells your mind to appreciate it.

So while those of us who share the passion/ sickness for building might notice and discuss the finer details amongst ourselves, we're also more than happy when people simply go, 'Oh that's a nice bike: Job done.

 ??  ?? If it had been my own bike I'd have used rear speedway tyres, the same as I do for racing. They're not exactly road legal but cheap at 45 quid each. But I figured for a bike for someone else I'd best fit something that complies with the law. Chunky 4.00 x 19s it is then
There is something delightful about blasted hubs, stainless spokes, alloy rims and chunky tyres. And there needs to be, to stop you fretting over the 250 quid each wheel stands you...
If it had been my own bike I'd have used rear speedway tyres, the same as I do for racing. They're not exactly road legal but cheap at 45 quid each. But I figured for a bike for someone else I'd best fit something that complies with the law. Chunky 4.00 x 19s it is then There is something delightful about blasted hubs, stainless spokes, alloy rims and chunky tyres. And there needs to be, to stop you fretting over the 250 quid each wheel stands you...
 ??  ??
 ??  ?? Spot the deliberate mistake. Well, the stupid accidental­onein fact. Yes, some idiot wrote his figures down wrong and ordered halfhis spokes way too short. 95mm rather than 195mm in fact. That would be one side for each wheel wrong, and 50 quid's worth ofstainles­s spokes in the bin, plus waiting for an equally expensive newset to be made. Twerp
Spot the deliberate mistake. Well, the stupid accidental­onein fact. Yes, some idiot wrote his figures down wrong and ordered halfhis spokes way too short. 95mm rather than 195mm in fact. That would be one side for each wheel wrong, and 50 quid's worth ofstainles­s spokes in the bin, plus waiting for an equally expensive newset to be made. Twerp
 ??  ?? Always one ofthe nicest bits ofbike building the big box arrives containing all the nice new shiny stuff. Hurrah!
Always one ofthe nicest bits ofbike building the big box arrives containing all the nice new shiny stuff. Hurrah!
 ??  ?? I had rear shocks with springs that were too short but ofthe right rating, with knackered dampers. And · I had rear shocks with good dampers but too strong springs. So a bunch ofmix'n'match and making up spring spacers was called for. But that's a bunch ofmoney saved by using what was lying around
I had rear shocks with springs that were too short but ofthe right rating, with knackered dampers. And · I had rear shocks with good dampers but too strong springs. So a bunch ofmix'n'match and making up spring spacers was called for. But that's a bunch ofmoney saved by using what was lying around
 ??  ?? ...and a dollop offiling. I was really chuffed with this set-up, it's tucked away ever so neatly, and is really functional no unsightly torque arm or loosening the bolts to adjust the chain. Grand as owt
...and a dollop offiling. I was really chuffed with this set-up, it's tucked away ever so neatly, and is really functional no unsightly torque arm or loosening the bolts to adjust the chain. Grand as owt
 ??  ?? One ofthe aesthetici­ssues I have with the Starfire I Victor series frames is the very upright stance ofthe rear shocks. They are almost vertical, and hence really offensive to the eye, I figured I could do better than that. So Mr Angle Grinder came for tea again, cut the top mounts off, and cut away some ofthe rear downtube
One ofthe aesthetici­ssues I have with the Starfire I Victor series frames is the very upright stance ofthe rear shocks. They are almost vertical, and hence really offensive to the eye, I figured I could do better than that. So Mr Angle Grinder came for tea again, cut the top mounts off, and cut away some ofthe rear downtube
 ??  ?? ...followed bya splash ofwelding...
...followed bya splash ofwelding...
 ??  ?? The answer (like the answer to many things), is to get the angle grinder out. A good coat ofcutting on the swinging arm...
The answer (like the answer to many things), is to get the angle grinder out. A good coat ofcutting on the swinging arm...
 ??  ?? I was using Can-am hubs both ends, kindly supplied yet again by Paul and Dave at Military Can-am. The rear was in fact a very rare one, with a slider and cable rather than torque arm and rod. So I needed to fathom out how to locate everything
I was using Can-am hubs both ends, kindly supplied yet again by Paul and Dave at Military Can-am. The rear was in fact a very rare one, with a slider and cable rather than torque arm and rod. So I needed to fathom out how to locate everything

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