FOR­GET MY NAME

NOT- QUITE- TO­TAL RE­CALL

Real Crime - - Home Invasion - Steve Wright

RE­LEASED OUT NOW AUTHOR J. S. MON­ROE PUB­LISHER HEAD OF ZEUS AVAIL­ABLE IN HARD­BACK

Mon­roe has proven him­self the mas­ter of the cov­er­line hook; amid row af­ter row of other nov­els, the premise of his sto­ries have a habit of mak­ing his books stand out.

Hav­ing per­fected this abil­ity with the break­neck Find Me, he re­peats the trick with For­get My Name, which sees a woman turn up in an English vil­lage, un­able to re­mem­ber any­thing about her­self – in­clud­ing her name. She has a sus­pi­cion that the house she hones in on is where she ei­ther lives or once lived, but be­yond that re­mem­bers noth­ing.

In­evitably, there’s way more than ini­tially meets the eye, with Mon­roe us­ing this set­ting as a launch­pad for a whole ar­ray of plot twists and in­trigues, where past and present col­lide and old feel­ings resur­face in un­ex­pected and some­times de­struc­tive ways. The writ­ing style feels in­formed by some of the greats of crime fic­tion – the likes of Agatha Christie and Ray­mond Chan­dler are ever- present in Mon­roe’s writ­ing.

Grat­i­fy­ingly, none of the rev­e­la­tions or twists feel in any way like cop outs. Ev­ery­thing works seam­lessly, and while you cer­tainly don’t get all the an­swers you were per­haps look­ing for, enough is re­solved to leave you with a sense of a jour­ney trav­elled.

So all in all, For­get My Name rep­re­sents a re­fresh­ing in­stance of a book de­liv­er­ing on the in­trigue and ex­pec­ta­tion of its cov­er­line blurb. We hate to use the phrase ‘ page- turner’, but there you go…

IF YOU LIKE THIS TRY...Sharp Ob­jectsGil­lian Flynn The pro­tag­o­nist is forced to re­turn to a child­hood home of trau­matic mem­o­ries.

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