Rochdale Observer

African community book was launched

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●●10 years ago: A NEW book put together by Rochdale’s African community was launched.

New Steps for African Communitie­s (Nestac) and Cartwheel Arts publicised ‘Homelands’ at an evening of stories, food and music at the Ronald Gorton Centre,with guest stars Congolese band Britannia Kumba.

Kim Haygarth, co-ordinator of Cartwheel Arts’ creative writing project ‘Tell Us Another One’, said: “It was a wonderful night at the end of a brilliant storytelli­ng project.

“We’re really proud to have worked with Nestac and the local African community to produce such an interestin­g and unique book.”

The audience danced the night away to music provided by Britannia Rumba, up-and-coming Rochdale group Exotic and local MC Filza Fawad.

Book readings were given by two of the authors, Chanda Kapesa and Morisho Kaengele Oscar and guests were able to take their own copy of the book home.

Kim added: “Chanda and Morisho read their stories to a fantastic reception and everyone enjoyed delicious African food. MATRIMONIA­L fever hit Rochdale as Wardlewort­h Community Centre hosted a wedding mela.

The event aimed to promote the different kinds of wedding products and services on offer to the Asian community.

More than 150 people turned out to cast an eye over the wares of the different businesses from all over Greater Manchester.

Jewellers, beautician­s and clothes shops were showcased alongside florists, photograph­ers and stage and lighting companies.

Event co-organiser Shabnam Akhtab said: “All the children enjoying getting henna tattoos and there were a lot of young women who loved the beauty and jewellery stalls.”

Entertainm­ent at the mela was provided by DJ Billy Blitz.

Shabnam said: “There were many inquiries made about all the businesses and many of them took bookings for forthcomin­g events. TWO talented young artists from Bamford put their work on show at Bury’s grammar schools.

Sixteen-year-olds Aadhithya Anbahan and Mark Ghobrial were both studying GCSE art.

Guests were astounded by the quality of art coursework by Aadhithya in the show at Bury Grammar School for girls.

Aadhithya was born in Madras and used a summer holiday she took there as inspiratio­n for her work.

She persuaded members of her family and friends to model for her in traditiona­l Indian costume, resulting in a rich, vibrant celebratio­n of Indian culture.

A spokesman for the school said: “Aadhitya is a talented student and I have been very lucky to teach her.”

Mark, a pupil at Bury Grammar School for boys, showed his work to parents, the mayor of Bury and other guests at an exhibition.

He was one of the 21 art students whose coursework featured in the show.

The exhibition was visited by a moderator for the exam board AQA.

One of Mark’s pieces was a large canvas based on a recent trip to Egypt.

Other pieces focused on world cuisine.

Head of art Tim Burns said: “Mark wants to pursue a career in medicine but continue art as a hobby.” THERE was no loafing around for a Royton woman who was made redundant by a bakery.

For 46-year-old Denise Wild had her sights on becoming a writer.

Denise, of Dogford Road, had been working at Park Cake bakeries as an operative for eight years until she lost her job.

She had already had a collection of poems published entitled ‘Wild about Life’.

But she wanted to expand into children’s books, which would come in handy as she was also a foster carer.

Her taste for poetry grew after one of her poems was entered into a competitio­n and published in an anthology.

She went on to pen specialise­d poems for bereavemen­ts, births, marriages and other occasions, while selling some of her work for charity.

She said: “People kept saying I should write a book.

“At Park Cakes I have just been a clock number for eight years and now I want to make a name for myself.

“Someone said that reading my poems is like when you hear a nice song that says the things that you want to say.

“Maybe I can find the words that other people can’t.

“I’ve sold some of them at work but it’s not about making money.

“It’s about putting a smile on someone’s face and now I want to make a name for myself.”

Denise put her inspiratio­n down to the ‘brilliant range’ of people she has worked with. JUNIOR League had a telephone call from Rebecca Shaw’s mum saying how proud she was of her daughter and her friend Nicole Hill.

With Nicole’s help, Rebecca decided to make some bookmarks and sell them for £1 each to all her friends and staff at Healey Primary School.

The duo raised over £100 which was going towards Guide Dogs for the blind. A DISPLAY of work by the Rochdale Embroidere­r’s Guild was admired by more than 90 guests.

Members of the guild were on hand to answer questions about the various designs and techniques used by the group, which met at Norden Methodist Church Hall.

A spokeswoma­n said: “The work was beautifull­y arranged and greatly admired. Most visitors made this their first port of call.”

Members also relaxed and chatted with their visitors while enjoying a cup of tea with delicious home-made scones, strawberry jam and cream.

And they enjoyed the bring and buy stall, which sold craft and home-made items.

 ??  ?? ●●Rebecca Shaw with mum and Nicole Hill
●●Rebecca Shaw with mum and Nicole Hill
 ??  ?? ●●Peggy Mulongo from New Steps for African Communitie­s group at the launch of ‘Homelands’
●●Peggy Mulongo from New Steps for African Communitie­s group at the launch of ‘Homelands’
 ??  ?? ●●Aadhithya Anbahan won praise for her GCSE artwork
●●Aadhithya Anbahan won praise for her GCSE artwork
 ??  ?? ●●At the wedding Mela in Wardlewort­h were Andrew Ovens, Taz, Nadeem Akhtar and Salim
●●At the wedding Mela in Wardlewort­h were Andrew Ovens, Taz, Nadeem Akhtar and Salim
 ??  ?? ●●Norden Church Hall embroidere­rs, from left, Jean Goodchild, Yvonne Statham and Joyce Bargh
●●Norden Church Hall embroidere­rs, from left, Jean Goodchild, Yvonne Statham and Joyce Bargh
 ??  ?? ●●Denise Wild published a poem book
●●Denise Wild published a poem book

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