BBC Sky at Night Magazine

1. NORTHWEST AND WEST

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We’ll start by facing the northwest and locating our first target, the Plough. This month, the Plough skirts just above the horizon, near the bottom of the path it appears to trace around Polaris (the North Star). As time goes on, we can watch it turn and gradually swing upwards and towards the east.

Turning towards our left, we’ll see some of the last of spring’s stars. Crossing the dim stars of Boötes, the Herdsman, we reach my favourite small constellat­ion: the C-shaped Corona Borealis, the Northern Crown. Directly above Alphecca, this constellat­ion’s brightest star, are the dim stars of Hercules. I often find these tricky, but if you are scanning the skies above Alphecca with a pair of binoculars or a small telescope, you may be able to find the hundreds of thousands of suns of the Great Globular Cluster, M13, about halfway along the line upwards to Vega.

 ??  ?? The Great Globular Cluster, M13, in Hercules is brimming with stars
The Great Globular Cluster, M13, in Hercules is brimming with stars

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