A Mar­mite mo­ment for pro­jec­tion clocks

Solihull News - - IT TALK - BY DAVE PINWELL

THE pre- Christ­mas on­line mar­ket seems awash with pro­jec­tion clocks, with a score of mod­els el­bow­ing for promi­nence in what could be a high- sell­ing trend in af­ford­able elec­tronic gifts.

As giz­mos go, they suf­fer from the Mar­mite ef­fect. Some peo­ple love hav­ing the time pro­jected on the bed­room wall through the night, so that they can open their eyes mid- doze and check the time with­out rais­ing a head from the pil­low or reach for the specs.

Oth­ers hate the idea, par­tic­u­larly those with a pen­chant for black­out cur­tains, who get dis­turbed by any overnight light, es­pe­cially one that has move­ment ev­ery minute.

The well- rated mpow model, looks stream­lined and sim­ple.

Its ten cen­time­tre LED dis­play con­cen­trates on telling the time, which it also projects through a 120- de­gree ro­ta­tion.

Its FM ra­dio and USB port for overnight phone charg­ing add to its value and pop­u­lar­ity.

The highly- lauded Ore­gon Sci­en­tific mod­els look more clunky but are more gen­er­ously fea­tured.

The an­tique ra­dio- style shap­ing of their RM313 Funky is ac­com­pa­nied by a dis­play which also shows the date and room tem­per­a­ture – the lat­ter re­duc­ing shocks on win­ter morn­ings.

It also sets the time from ra­dio sig­nals, so no more awk­ward fid­dling af­ter a power cut.

One for kids, of all ages, is the Tardis Pro­jec­tion Clock, shaped like the good Doc­tor’s time trav­el­ling po­lice box and even sound­ing like it when its alarm goes off, which is also, how­ever, the only point at which its time projects on the wall.

Of the above, the mpow costs about £ 25 and the other two about £ 20, but there are plenty of oth­ers to choose from.

One or kids, of all ages, is the Tardis Pro­jec­tion Clock, shaped like the good Doc­tor’s time trav­el­ling po­lice box.

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