Sin­gle Cheryl is on wrong track with her new sin­gle

Sunday Mail (UK) - - Front Page -

Now she’s binned toy­boy Liam Payne, Cheryl’s re­turn­ing to what she does best.

No, not mar­ry­ing twits or col­lect­ing sur­names. She’s just re­leased a new sin­gle, Love Made Me Do It.

It ffea­tures such ge­nius lines as: “Oh my God, Cheryl I’m such a sucker, I fall in love with every f*****.”

So Bob Dy­lan can rest easy on his No­bel prize.

Chez in­sists the track is not about her baby’s dad. Of course not.

Be­cause then she’d be singing: “Oh my God, he’s just a wean, why did I get with Liam Payne?”

We’re not church-go­ers, or­di­nar­ily. Not even at Christ­mas. But both my boys are in the Scouts and are en­cour­aged to at­tend along with their fam­i­lies and, on this one day of the year, we make the ef­fort.

We’ve been for the past few years so I know the walls won’t fall down around us.

It’s not re­ally about re­li­gion or faith. Frankly, I’d pray to any­one’s god if I thought it would bring last­ing peace in this world and stop all war.

No, it’s just about show­ing re­spect. Quite a sim­ple no­tion, re­ally. I don’t feel obliged to go any more than I feel forced to wear a red poppy but I do feel a need to show re­spect.

We are not the type to write an­gry let­ters to TV com­pa­nies if any pre­sen­ter, newsreader, talk show guest or Strictly con­tes­tant ap­pears on screen for a mi­cro-mo­ment with­out wear­ing a small red flower.

But I will pin pop­pies pies on to my chil­dren’s jack­ets to­day and that’s cer­tainly noth­ing to do with the glo­ri­fi­ca­tion of war, as for­mer SNP jus­tice min­is­ter Kenny Ma­cAskill has cited d as his rea­son for re­fus­ing to wear a pop­py­oppy this year. year

He put his money in the col­lec­tion box but didn’t take the flower. His choice but I think he got it wrong.

It’s that word “re­spect” again, for the mil­lions who have died, dragged into wars that were not of their mak­ing, of the generations lost be­cause they were treated as can­non fod­der, the massed ranks of work­ing-class sol­diers sac­ri­ficed as ex­pend­able.

That’s what I teach my kids to re­mem­ber, the hor­ror not the “glory”, a red poppy for spilled blood.

Last year, the Scouts read out names and de­tails of lo­cal peo­ple killed in World War I, young men cut down in their prime, all the prom­ise of their lives ex­tin­guished, all the talent they might have brought us gone.

A cen­tury af­ter their deaths, it still brought tears to the eyes.

This year, I’ll also be think­ing about those mod­ern-day ser­vice per­son­nel so trau­ma­tised by their ex­pe­ri­ences that there now seems to be an epi­demic of sui­cide among them.

In 2018, there’s been the equiv­a­lent of one death every six days, prompt­ing Men­tal Health Min­is­ter Clare Haughey to launch a na­tional cri­sis plan.

Those suf­fer­ing from PTSD may have been ex­e­cuted dur­ing World War I. To­day, some feel driven to take their own lives.

And there’s some­thing ter­ri­bly wrong if we re­mem­ber those who died on Flan­ders Fields but leave to suf­fer those who sur­vived more re­cent bat­tles.

Green MSP Pa­trick Harvie chooses to wear a white poppy, a sym­bol of peace which he says is ac­knowl­edge­ment of vic­tims of war world­wide, not just our own. He may have a point.

The Co­op­er­a­tive Women’s Guild who in­tro­duced white pop­pies in 191933 were taking a stance against war and vi­o­lence and th­ese were women who had al­ready lost hus­bands, broth­ers andd sons in con­flict. The be­reaved are vic­tims too.

Maybe next year, when this sen­si­tive centenary has passed, it could be time to add a white poppy to our red ones as we at­tend Ar­mistice Day ser­vices.

Red and white to­gether: Re­mem­brance and peace, ac­knowl­edge­ment of the past, hope for the fu­ture, re­spect for all.

Re­mem­brance Day 2019 could find us in self-im­posed iso­la­tion, no longer a mem­ber of the friendly union of Euro­pean coun­tries that has, in no small way, con­trib­uted to 73 years of peace.

We for­get many things too quickly, if we al­low it.

BUM NOTE

NO N POPPY PO For­mer Fo jus­tice jumM min­is­ter Ma­cAskill

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