Sunday Mail (UK)

WHYTE v COPS

Police federation chief slams claims about officers in Craig Whyte’s Rangers book

- ■ Gordon Blackstock

The former bankrupt and banned company director who took over Rangers has been n taken to task over outlandish claims made in his new book – by the police.

Craig Whyte has been accused of sensationa­lism in self-serving memoir Into The e Bear Pit by the body which h represents Scotland’s officers. .

Whyte claimed the detective ve who arrested him invited him m for a drink afterwards and said id officers sang banned song The he Billy Boys in front of witnesses. s.

He also claims cops loved the he media attention from his highprofil­e arrest and used the case se as a boast at “the Masonic lodge”. e”.

But Calum Steele, general al secretary of the Scottish Police ce Federation, said: “We need to remember Craig Whyte is trying ng to sell a book. He’s going to use every trick he has to maximise his opportunit­y for a sale.

“He wi l l be oversensat­ionalising events to make things sound more interestin­g than they actually were.

“I don’t think this sounds like it is ref lective of the reality of events.”

Into The Bear Pit makes allegation­s about senior off icer DCI Jim Robertson, who led the crim criminal investigat­ion into Wh Whyte. When he was arrested in 2014, Whyte said he was “surprised at how chatty the po police were”.

He wrote: “Robertson told me wha what a Rangers fan he was. He’d been enjoying investigat­ing the case, meeting all his Rangers heroes. ‘ When this is all over,’ he said, smiling, ‘maybe we could go for a drink together.’ Bizarre doesn’t even come close.” He goes on to cite “rumours” of officers singing bigot chant The Billy Boys at witnesses during the investigat­ion. He also says police refused to let him escape the media scrum by allowing him to leave court by a back door. He wrote: “They love seeing themselves on telly and want the public spectacle so, when they go into the Masonic lodge, they can say, ‘ I’m the guy that arrested Craig Whyte.’”

Former administra­tors at Rangers, David Whitehouse and Paul Clark, are suing the Lord Advocate and Police Scotland for wrongful detention, arrest and prosecutio­n.

Police Scotland said: “As there are ongoing legal proceeding­s associated with these matters, we are unable to comment in detail.”

Elsewhere in the book, Whyte also makes accusation­s about Scotland’s legal system.

He says the then lord advocate Frank Mulholland told guests in hospitalit­y at Celtic Park that he was “confident” he would “definitely be found guilty”. He also claims a sheriff told him: “Call me if you ever need anything from the sheriff courts. I’ll do anything for Rangers FC.”

The Judicial Office for Scotland said: “It would be inappropri­ate to comment on unfounded claims.”

In 2011, Whyte bought Rangers from David Murray for just £1.

In 2012, the club went into administra­tion, then liquidatio­n.

Days later, Whyte admitted using future season ticket sales to fund buying the club.

In 2017, Whyte was acquitted of fraud charges relating to the takeover.

Business man Willie Haughey has denied Whyte’s claim he tried to buy Rangers. The tycoon said he had instructed lawyers to get it removed from the book. He added: “I never had a conversati­on with Craig Whyte about buying Rangers.”

 ??  ??
 ??  ?? ANGRY Haughey denies Whyte’s claims in book, above
LEGAL ACTION Whitehouse and Clark, left, in 2012, are suing Police Scotland and Lord Advocate
ANGRY Haughey denies Whyte’s claims in book, above LEGAL ACTION Whitehouse and Clark, left, in 2012, are suing Police Scotland and Lord Advocate
 ??  ?? SCRUM Police protect Whyte as he leaves Glasgow Sheriff Court in September 2015
SCRUM Police protect Whyte as he leaves Glasgow Sheriff Court in September 2015
 ??  ?? CLAIM Mulholland. Top, Steele
CLAIM Mulholland. Top, Steele

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from United Kingdom