The Courier & Advertiser (Angus and Dundee)

No can do: It’s time to ban energy drinks in schools

The Courier is calling on all secondary head teachers to stop pupils bringing energy drinks into school

- DAVE LORD

Disruptive behaviour, cardiac problems, nervousnes­s, insomnia, headaches, anxiety... all problems associated with too much caffeine.

Yet in schools throughout Tayside and Fife youngsters are regularly exceeding safe limits by guzzling so-called energy drinks.

Teachers are being forced to deal with the unruly behaviour of pupils for whom consumptio­n has become part of the daily routine.

We think it’s unacceptab­le, so The Courier today launches the “Can it!” campaign. We want secondary schools across Courier Country to ban caffeine-laden fizzy drinks.

The Courier today launches a campaign to encourage local secondary schools to ban caffeine-based fizzy drinks.

These so-called ‘energy’ drinks can lead to a host of problems in our classrooms, and we believe enough is enough.

Just last week Forfar Academy rector Melvyn Lynch spoke out about the issues the beverages can cause — and the extra pressure it is putting on teachers.

He cited everything from unruly behaviour to insomnia and even bedwetting as potential consequenc­es of indulgence.

Teachers in our local schools are rightly proud of the job they do.

However, the widespread consumptio­n of energy drinks — for some youngsters they even represent breakfast — is making teaching more difficult.

And the issues go beyond anti-social and disruptive behaviour, although that is bad enough.

Nutritioni­sts warn of the potentiall­y devastatin­g impacts of a diet rich in caffeine and sugar.

Safe levels of caffeine vary, but are said to be approximat­ely 100mg per day for teenagers. Some of the drinks we want to see outlawed in schools contain between 240mg and 500mg.

Over-consumptio­n can cause nervousnes­s, behavioura­l disorder, heart irregulari­ties, upset stomachs and restlessne­ss.

When taken in excess by those with diabetes or cardiac abnormalit­ies, the consequenc­es can be even more serious.

So just what do we hope to achieve?

We want secondary schools across Courier Country to commit to banning the consumptio­n of caffeine-laden ‘energy’ drinks during school hours.

We hope parents will also support our bid by doing their bit to curb teenagers’ intake of caffeine drinks.

As an incentive to participat­ing schools, The Courier will provide reusable water bottles to all S1 pupils joining after the summer break.

To sign-up to our campaign, local schools need only register by contacting Please include the name of your school and a brief outline of your reason for signing up. We will then include your school’s name in our ‘hall of fame’ — and arrange for the delivery of the water bottles. Forfar Academy’s Melvyn Lynch took a bold step in banning the drinks from his school. We salute his stance. We would now urge other schools to follow in his trail-blazing footsteps.

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 ?? Pictures: Paul Reid and Kim Cessford. ?? Melvyn Lynch at Forfar Academy with some of the drinks he is concerned about. The Courier salutes his bold step in banning the drinks from his school, and would now urge other schools to follow in his trail-blazing footsteps.
Pictures: Paul Reid and Kim Cessford. Melvyn Lynch at Forfar Academy with some of the drinks he is concerned about. The Courier salutes his bold step in banning the drinks from his school, and would now urge other schools to follow in his trail-blazing footsteps.
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